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Sen. McCain ‘cannot in good conscience’ vote for proposed GOP health law

Sen. John McCain, whose thumbs-down crushed his Republican colleagues’ previous attempt to repeal Obamacare, put a last-ditch effort to meet their long-sought goal on the ropes.

The Arizona lawmaker on Friday said in a statement “I cannot in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal,” a bill that takes funds for health care out of federal control and places them in states’ hands. It would also eliminate the unpopular individual and employer mandates, but critics have come out against how it allocates Medicaid funding and the potential for insurers to raise premiums on people with pre-existing conditions.

McCain is the second Republican to come out as a firm “no” against the bill, joining Sen. Rand Paul, who says the proposal doesn’t go far enough in replacing the Affordable Care Act. Maine Sen. Susan Collins on Friday said she is “leaning against” the bill, and Alaska’s Lisa Murkowski has expressed strong reservations.

Republican senators have until Sept. 30 to push a repeal bill through. After that, protections will expire that keep the measure from being filibustered and allows passage with a simple majority vote. With 52 seats and unanimous Democratic opposition, the GOP can only afford to lose two votes — Pence would cast the tie-breaking vote if the count is 50-50.

McCain is a close friend of South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, who proposed the bill along with Louisiana’s Bill Cassidy, but he has come out strongly against the rushed nature of the measure, which will see limited debate and time in front of committees.

“As I have repeatedly stressed, health care reform legislation ought to be the product of regular order in the Senate,” the statement reads. “Committees of jurisdiction should mark up legislation with input from all committee members, and send their bill to the floor for debate and amendment. That is the only way we might achieve bipartisan consensus on lasting reform, without which a policy that affects one-fifth of our economy and every single American family will be subject to reversal with every change of administration and congressional majority.”

McCain, who is battling brain cancer, provided the decisive tally to kill the Republicans’ “skinny repeal” measure in an early morning vote July 29.

“I take no pleasure in announcing my opposition. Far from it,” McCain said of his latest decision. “The bill’s authors are my dear friends, and I think the world of them. I know they are acting consistently with their beliefs and sense of what is best for the country. So am I.”

Graham responded on Twitter: “My friendship with [McCain] is not based on how he votes but respect for how he’s lived his life and the person he is.”

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) released a statement on McCain’s announcement, saying he “shows the same courage in Congress that he showed when he was a naval aviator. I have assured Senator McCain that as soon as repeal is off the table, we Democrats are intent on resuming the bipartisan process.”

Article source: http://www.wcvb.com/article/sen-mccain-cannot-in-good-conscience-vote-for-gop-health-law/12453376

Dawood in good health, lives in Pakistan, Iqbal Kaskar tells police

THANE: Under interrogation in police custody, Iqbal Ibrahim Kaskar has categorically stated that his brother and fugitive mafia don Dawood Ibrahim Kaskar is very much in Pakistan and in good health, official sources revealed on Friday.

Despite reports in India that Dawood is very ill and crippled due to multiple ailments, Iqbal has claimed that his brother is in fact “very fit and fine” and even keeps moving around in cities in like Karachi, Lahore or Rawalpindi, under tight security, Iqbal told investigating officials.

Iqbal was arrested early on Tuesday by a crack team of Thane Anti-Extortion Cell headed by former encounter specialist Pradeep Sharma who had picked him up from his Mumbai home late on Monday night in an extortion case.

Besides Dawood – who has links with Latin American drug mafia, his brother Anees Ibrahim Kaskar and a close aide Chhota Shakeel also live in a posh locality in Karachi, Iqbal told interrogators.

Significantly, the revelation came on a day when Indian diplomat Eenam Gambhir termed Pakistan as “terroristan” at the United Nations General Assembly for its support to terrorism.

In another shocking disclosure, Iqbal said that his sister-in-law, Mehjabin Shaikh (Dawood’s wife) visited Mumbai sometime in 2016 to meet her father, Salim Kashmiri, before quietly departing.

It is not clear how she gained entry or under what identity she managed to travel to India and returned without detection by multiple agencies.

Sharma told media persons that the statements made by Iqbal, including whether an extortion racket is run in his name, shall be independently verified before arriving at any conclusion.

Iqbal claimed that Dawood has not called up his family in India since the past couple of years fearing his calls may be tapped by various agencies, but Anees usually speaks with the family on festivals like Eid.

During the grilling sessions, Iqbal also provided the location addresses of four residences belonging to Dawood in Karachi and other information about the family.

He admitted that his brother Anees had called him from some international numbers, but denied that his brothers had involvement in the extortion racket for which he (Iqbal) has been arrested.

Deported from the United Arab Emirates in 2003, Iqbal was arrested after he allegedly threatened a builder in Thane using Dawood’s name and demanded four flats and Rs 30 lakh cash.

Late on Monday, when Sharma’s team reached his south Mumbai home, Iqbal was busy watching the “Kaun Banega Crorepati” show and eating biryani.

He sought permission to finish his biryani, which Sharma allowed and even advised him to take his medicines if reqiored before whisking him off to Thane.

Article source: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/dawood-in-good-health-lives-in-pakistan-iqbal-kaskar-tells-police/articleshow/60796818.cms

Steve Kerr ‘on a good path’ health-wise

  • Head coach Steve Kerr looks down the bench at his players as the Golden State Warriors played the Minnesota Timberwolves at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Tuesday, April 4, 2017. Photo: Carlos Avila Gonzalez, The Chronicle

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Growing up in Los Angeles, Steve Kerr came to appreciate one of the great Dodgers play-by-play announcer Vin Scully’s go-to axioms: “We’re all day-to-day.”

It is a phrase the Warriors’ head coach figures sums up his current health status. After an offseason spent trying to find a solution to the chronic pain that has plagued him for more than two years, Kerr still experiences blinding headaches, dizziness and nausea — the nagging aftermath from a back surgery that resulted in a spinal-fluid leak.

“I feel better,” Kerr said at the team’s Media Day. “I’m not 100 percent, but I’m on a good path. I’m confident I’ll be 100 percent at some point. I’d rather it be sooner than later. It’s been a long odyssey, as you know. It hasn’t been easy, but I’m lucky to have the support of, not only the players, but (general manager) Bob (Myers) and (majority owner) Joe (Lacob). They’ve been so supportive. I’m looking forward to the season. I’m excited.”

Kerr’s health is one of the biggest questions looming over another championship-or-bust season. Though he has done his best to handle his symptoms, Kerr missed the first 43 games of the 2015-16 season and 11 games of the 2017 playoffs to seek an answer to his pain. The hope is that he won’t have to step away from the bench again.

“He looks and feels good, is in good spirits,” Myers said. “In his mind, he’s coaching our entire season.”

Connor Letourneau is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: cletourneau@sfchronicle.com. Twitter: @Con_Chron

Article source: http://www.sfgate.com/warriors/article/Steve-Kerr-on-a-good-path-health-wise-12221314.php

Healthy living tips from a centenarian | KSL.com

SOUTH JORDAN — One in 26 baby boomers are now expected to live into their 100s, but will that life be a happy and healthy one?

From his Sagewood at Daybreak home, Claudio dos Santos said, “Sometimes I think this is a blessing or a curse,” referring to his long life of 102 years.

The native Brazilian said one of his secrets is exercise. “Right now I do exercise before I get out of bed for the legs,” Santos said.

Diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2003, he said he got tired going to the doctor every month and took matters into his own hands. He said he beat the disease by educating himself, seeking out information and adding nuts, berries and seeds to his diet.

“I think if you take good care of yourself you will get somewhere,” said Santos.

Santos uses his cellphone daily to make calls and text.

He taught himself how to use a computer, and he’s even on Facebook.

“Technology is the same as walking. If you stop you are not walking, somebody is coming right behind you so you need to keep abreast with what’s going on in the world,” said Santos.



Exercise, eating, studying and technology help a 102-year-old South Jordan man live a happy, healthy life. (Photo: KSL TV)

He Skypes with his cousin in Sao Paulo, Brazil, every night, watching programs and going on Google map adventures.

“The computer is something that can make you young because you have the world in your hands,” said Santos.

And to keep his mind sharp, his friend recently taught him how to play chess.

“It’s good for the brain,” said Santos, and boosting that brain power is good for the body.

While his wife was alive he made his own breakfast, one banana and one orange. He said he also stays away from junk food.

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Football superstar David Beckham in Singapore: On healthy living and more

As part of the AIA Healthy Living Tour, AIA global ambassador David Beckham was in Singapore today during the AIA Vitality Healthy Cookout Showdown to share his passion for wellness and healthy living.

A former professional footballer known for his work with Manchester United, the England national team, LA Galaxy, and more, Beckham is a strong and avid believer in the value of health and wellness, and that everyone has a role to play in taking charge of their health.

In a media interaction session with Human Resources, find out what he has to say about maintaining a healthy lifestyle – working out, eating well, and balancing work commitments with family time.

David Beckham’s in town for AIA event

Q AS AIA’S NEW GLOBAL AMBASSADOR AND AS PART OF THE NEW “WHAT’S YOUR WHY” CAMPAIGN, WOULD YOU SHARE A BIT MORE ABOUT YOUR MOTIVATION BEHIND LIVING A HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE?

I’m obviously very excited to be back here in Singapore – I love spending time here, so I never need an excuse to come back. Being an ambassador to AIA allows me to be able to spend more time here, so I’m very happy about that.

With AIA, what we are doing is helping to change people’s lives for the better – to help people to live healthier, better lives, be active, do the small things because they are the things that really count at times. I think it is the important part of healthy living.

Q IN SINGAPORE, WHEN PEOPLE START WORKING, A LOT OF THEM HAVE VERY SEDENTARY LIFESTYLES. WOULD YOU HAVE ANY TIPS ON HOW WE CAN MAINTAIN A HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE?

I think that’s the difficult part. When we all have jobs and we all have busy lives and some people have children, your main focus has to be your job and your children. Sometimes, it’s difficult to find time to workout, to keep fit, to eat healthy – because especially when you travel, you have to really work hard at finding a way to eat healthy and eat well.

I think the small things are the things that really make a difference. Such as, instead of driving to work, walk to work; instead of driving to lunch, walk to lunch. It’s sometimes the small things that really make a difference.

Even with the kids – walking them to school or when we spend time over the weekends, we’re riding bikes. Sometimes, it’s really those small things that matter.

Q EVERYBODY IS VERY INTERESTED IN HOW YOU START YOUR DAY, WHAT IS YOUR MORNING LIKE AND WHAT IS IT THAT GETS YOU THROUGH THE DAY AND HOW DO YOU MOTIVATE YOURSELF TO KEEP DOING IT?

I have four children and I’m very lucky to be able to spend most of my time at home. One of the main things that I am able to do is to take my kids to school most mornings whereas most parents might not have the opportunity – at times, I don’t too, because I travel for work.

My day when I’m at home is to wake up at a quarter to seven, wake the children up, make them breakfast, get them ready for school, and take them to school. Then I workout and grab some breakfast – at times that is anything that the kids have left over. I’ll then go to the office, do some work, and I’m ready to pick my children up again.

Most of my day is centred around the children, because when I do travel, it’s very difficult to be away from them, so when I am at home, I’m there with them.

Q IS THERE A WORKOUT REGIME THAT YOU’VE PICKED UP FROM YOUR FOOTBALL DAYS THAT YOU STILL DO TODAY AND WHY?

There isn’t really one. When you’re a professional athlete, you’re so regimented in what you do, how you workout and what you eat. When you finish, it’s a different thing. You have to find something that you love doing, something that keeps your mind interested.

I love to cycle – I do a lot of indoor cycling; I do boxing from time to time – I don’t like to get hit of course so I try to avoid that. But I like to box, I like to cycle, and from time to time I like to run.

Q IS THERE ANYTHING THAT YOU PARTICULARLY DISLIKE WHEN IT COMES TO WORKOUTS AND HOW DO YOU GET AROUND IT? HOW DO YOU MOTIVATE YOURSELF TO DO IT?

There’s nothing I really dislike about working out. I’ve never really done a lot of weights, it’s something that is good from time to time, but for myself, it doesn’t suit my body type. It’s something I’ve never done even when I was playing.

But I don’t dislike it. I like to workout in general so there’s nothing I really dislike.

Q TALKING ABOUT SINGAPOREANS’ FAVOURITE TOPIC – FOOD -  WHICH DO YOU THIS IS BETTER? HEALTHY DIET OR EXERCISE? WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ABOUT HOW BEING HEALTHY IS MORE THAN JUST LOSING WEIGHT.

I think they are both just as important. It doesn’t have to be expensive or time consuming like going to the gym and things like that. It can just be going for a walk or going for a bike ride. Diet is also important.

It’s important to eat healthy in the morning, afternoon, evening, and even during snack time – it’s always important to eat the right things.

We don’t always eat the right things, and that’s ok. It’s actually ok to have those moments where you eat those things you shouldn’t. But healthy eating is something that is very important in, especially when you get older and live your lives.

Q HOW HAS YOUR DIET CHANGED EVER SINCE YOU’VE STOPPED PLAYING PROFESSIONALLY?

Not that much really. It has changed slightly because when I was playing, every time we travel somewhere, we had to eat the same thing. We couldn’t have a glass of wine from time to time, because that kind of thing was frowned upon.

Since I’ve stopped playing, I’m able to have a glass of wine on a Friday night or Saturday, when I’ve never done that before. Things have changed slightly, but I’ve always tried to eat the right things and drink the right things.

That’s the way I’ve always lived my life so nothing has really changed in that sense.

Q WHAT’S ONE DISH THAT ALWAYS WORKS AT THE BECKHAM DINNER TABLE? AND CAN IT BE SOMETHING THAT IS HEALTHY, THE KIDS LOVE, AND IS EASY TO MAKE IN 30 MINUTES?

The kids do love to eat salad – believe it or not, that’s true. Even Harper who is 7 loves salad. Cruz in particular, loves iceberg lettuce with balsamic vinegar – of course, healthy balsamic vinegar. It’s something that the kids love and we’re very lucky with.

The one thing that I would say isn’t too healthy is pasta. They love spaghetti bolognese – it’s something they love every time I make it.

Q ANY FINAL WORDS ABOUT THE COOKOUT OR TO SAY TO SINGAPOREANS ABOUT LIVING HEALTHIER?

I’m definitely looking forward to the cookout. I’m looking forward to find different ways of making traditional delicacies in a healthier way.

We found out in Hong Kong with the mooncakes, we found out about the healthy meatballs in Korea yesterday and now we’re going to find out about how to make traditional Singaporean dishes healthily (think Chili Crab, Roti Jala, Nasi Lemak, Laksa, and Hokkien Noodles).

To all my fans in Singapore, I just want to say thank you for all your support. It’s amazing to still visit the places I’ve been to when I played with the teams that I have been with and still get the same welcome. It’s why I keep coming back and it’s why I keep coming back to places in Asia. Singapore is one of my favourites so I’m glad that I keep coming back.

Earlier this month, AIA Group Limited, formally launched its partnership with David Beckham through a major new campaign in the Asia-Pacific region, “What’s Your Why?”, that reflects the commitment of both parties to helping people live longer, healthier, better lives.

As part of the launch, David Beckham will be undertaking the AIA Healthy Living Tour during the week of 18 September, visiting Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore and Malaysia.

In March 2017, AIA entered a multi-year agreement for David Beckham to become the Company’s Global Ambassador. In this newly created role Beckham will be present at a number of AIA’s most important community and business activities to personify and demonstrate the benefits and the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

This article was first published in HumanResources

Article source: http://www.asiaone.com/health/football-superstar-david-beckham-singapore-healthy-living-and-more

UT Medical Center’s Healthy Living Kitchen hosting Grocery Cart Makeover

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Article source: http://www.thedailytimes.com/business/ut-medical-center-s-healthy-living-kitchen-hosting-grocery-cart/article_ebb873d8-fcc8-54bc-8638-78d0a18a9c58.html

Experts offer tips for employers, workers to reduce stress

Public relations director Rick Wollman holds an architects rendering as work continues on the Advising Center and academic building construction projects Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014, at Sioux City’s Morningside College.

Article source: http://siouxcityjournal.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/experts-offer-tips-for-employers-workers-to-reduce-stress/article_92b21ce0-3d07-5f85-b9f1-1154d72fbdc1.html

Brain health tips from multi-talented star Hector Elizondo

As the homeless population grows and rents balloon in San Diego, city officials Thursday announced a series of proposals to help alleviate the housing shortage over the next 10 years.

Article source: http://www.cbs8.com/story/36421192/brain-health-tips-from-multi-talented-star-hector-elizondo

For moms, mental health is everything

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Mom Alia Dastagir encourages moms to talk about parenting struggles.
USA TODAY

I love my daughter. I don’t always love being a mother.

I’m exhausted most days. The bulk of the games my 2-year-old demands I play are so boring I could cry. She’s diminutive, but still puts me in a firm headlock when I try to leave her room each night. Getting her into the bath is practically a hostage negotiation. And that look she gives me when she dumps her dinner on the floor — what is that? I swear it’s voodoo.

Loving Atika is visceral, chemical, exquisite. But raising her can be tedious and depleting. If we suggest being a mother means we must be joyful all, or even most, of the time, we do all mothers a disservice. Motherhood is remarkably difficult. Acknowledging that and taking care of our mental health is as important as taking care of our babies.

More: Mom of twin boys says this keeps her stress, anxiety under control

More: Mom shares 3 tips for becoming more confident

More: ‘Breast is best’ mom confesses she uses formula

The facts:

Mental health won’t look the same for every mom, especially if there’s a clinical diagnosis. I didn’t have PPD nor am I suffering from depression, but I do struggle with anxiety. (I’m not taking medication, but if I felt I needed it, I would.) Here are three ways I try to keep myself mentally healthy:

If I’m not fine, I don’t pretend to be: Recognize it’s OK to talk candidly about the hard stuff. The guilt. I have guilt right now, writing a column that will live in perpetuity which my daughter may one day read and misunderstand. I feel guilty for missing the life I had before she was born. I feel guilty for missing the moments of levity between me and her dad that are so much less frequent since she arrived.

I’ve got my spirit mamas: It doesn’t have to be a tribe, but you do need people in your life you can be vulnerable with. Mom friends. An online community. A therapist. If you’re raising your kid(s) with a partner, lean on him or her. The more you talk, the more you realize you’re not alone.

I try to keep perspective: On days when it feels like you’re failing at everything (you missed a deadline, the toddler ate Werther’s Originals for dinner), remember that even when you’re down on yourself, your kids likely aren’t down on you. Unconditional love goes both ways.

Moms deal with a lot — and not just in the realm of discovering poop in peculiar places. We struggle with everything from poor parental leave policies to motherhood penalties at work to stigmas around breastfeeding. To survive in this world, and to have the energy to better it for our kids, we need to care for ourselves.

I might not always love being a mother, but I love myself. There’s no better way to show it than by prioritizing my mental health.

If you’re struggling with postpartum depression (PPD), seek help from a health care professional right away. If you’re not sure if you have PPD, take this online quiz and bring it with you to your appointment.

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CLOSEPRACTICAL VIDEOS ABOUT HEALTH… FOR MOMS BY MOMS
Mom Bod: Confessions of a breastfeeding mom | 1:00

Ashley May, a journalist at USA TODAY, shares how she’s meeting her breastfeeding goals.
USA TODAY

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Mom Bod: Tips for getting those recommended daily steps | 0:56

Michelle Washington, managing editor for STUDIO Gannett, makes time for walking 5 miles a day by getting a good night’s sleep, joining fitness challenges and making herself a priority.
Mom Bod

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Mom Bod: How to balance work and parenting responsibilities | 0:56

Nanci Bergman, mom to 9-year-old Dalton and CEO of ACCENT, says prioritized to-do lists help her stay on task.

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Mom Bod: Mom of toddler shares her secret to confidence | 0:59

A South Carolina mom says her side business gave her a boost of confidence she needed.

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Mom Bod: Babywearing can be its own workout | 1:10

Mary Nahorniak says babywearing helped her lose post-baby weight. She demonstrates three real-world movements she incorporates into her walks with Alice.
Ashley May

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Mom Bod: Mother of twins shares her stress-relieving secret | 0:51

Cynthia Robinson, senior operations editor at USA TODAY, advises moms of all ages to find their happy place.
Ashley May

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Mom Bod: These meal prep tips will save your weeknights | 1:00

Cara Richardson, senior digital editor at USA TODAY, tells how she saves time through the week by planning and preparing meals ahead.
Ashley May, Mom Bod

  • Mom Bod: Confessions of a breastfeeding mom
  • Mom Bod: Tips for getting those recommended daily steps
  • Mom Bod: How to balance work and parenting responsibilities
  • Mom Bod: Mom of toddler shares her secret to confidence
  • Mom Bod: Babywearing can be its own workout
  • Mom Bod: Mother of twins shares her stress-relieving secret
  • Mom Bod: These meal prep tips will save your weeknights

Mom Bod is a USA TODAY video series featuring tips from moms on fitness, nutrition and mental health. The goal? Let’s be real about the struggle to “healthy” and learn to love our mom bods.

Article source: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/09/21/moms-mental-health-everything/677653001/

Mental health staff on long-term stress leave up 22%

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PA

Image caption

Some trusts saw the number of staff taking long-term leave double in five years

The number of NHS mental health staff who have had to take sick leave because of their own mental health issues has risen by 22% in the past five years.

Those taking long-term leave of a month or more rose from 7,580 in 2012-13 to 9,285 in 2016-17, BBC freedom of information requests found.

The union Unite said cuts to staff and services were putting extra pressure on front-line mental health workers.

The Department of Health said it was transforming mental health care.

Out of 81 mental health authorities in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, 58 provided the BBC with comparable information.

Looking after ourselves

One mental health doctor who had to take mental health leave told 5 live anonymously: “I don’t think I realised it was happening until quite a long way down the road.”

She explained that she was getting irritable with her partner, her sleep was disturbed and she couldn’t switch off from work.

“In the end, I went to my GP who offered me a sick note. I was quite taken aback that it was quite so obvious to my GP that I needed to be off work.” she said.

Media captionFormer mental health nurse on why she had to leave the NHS

“As mental health practitioners, we are pretty rubbish at putting our own mental health first. You need to put your own oxygen mask on first before putting it on to someone else.”

5 live also spoke to a group of community mental health nurses at the Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust about how they cope with the pressure of the role.

“I think when you’re so passionate about something it’s very easy to overlook just how much you are taking on,” said Kate Ward, an occupational therapist working as a care co-ordinator in the team.

She said it was important for staff to understand what their thresholds are, recognising the early signs of their resilience getting chipped away.

“We think we are this person that can help everybody, but we have to remember that we have to help ourselves sometimes,” Julie Poole, a community mental health nurse, explained.

Image caption

Community mental health nurses spoke to 5 live about the pressures they face

Dave Munday, mental health professional lead at union Unite, which represents 100,000 health workers across the UK, said: “These figures are of real concern and they only tell part of the story.

“We know that many more mental health professionals will feel unwell but try to ‘soldier on’ or mask the real reason they’re taking leave.

“Our members tell us workplace stress is increasing and that cuts to staff and services mean they’re working longer hours with fewer resources.

“Staff themselves are feeling the impact of austerity and there’s a lack of trust in the often repeated but not fulfilled promises of the current government.”

Not good enough

A spokesman for the Royal College of Nursing said: “Mental health staff face unique challenges. The pressure to make the right decision and provide care for extremely vulnerable people against a backdrop of staff shortages, can take its toll on their health and wellbeing.

“More than 40,000 mental health staff are assaulted every year, and too often violence is seen as ‘part of the job’ by employers, and the authorities.

“This isn’t good enough. We want to see action on work-related stress, including violence at work which, as well as physical injuries, adds to burnout stress, and depression.”

The Department of Health said: “We are transforming mental health care for everyone in this country, including NHS employees, with record amounts of investment.

“There is more to do – that is why we are undertaking one of the largest expansions of mental health services in Europe, so that all staff have the time to look after themselves as well as others.”

Hear more from State of Mind, 5 live’s mental health season

Article source: http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41172805