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Charles Manson says he is in good health in taped prison phone call to pal before being taken to hospital

CHARLES Manson claims he is “solid as a rock” in a taped prison phone call to a pal obtained by Sun Online.

In the bombshell recording, Manson, who is currently serving a life sentence for the murders of pregnant actress Sharon Tate and six others, claims he is feeling “pretty good” when asked how he is doing.

 Manson is currently serving a life sentence at a Californian prison
Manson is currently serving a life sentence at a Californian prison

Gurecki claims the taped call from earlier this year is the last recorded phone call before Manson was taken to hospital last week, reportedly close to death.

It comes as another friend of Manson’s CR Wallace – also known as “Red Wolf” – told Sun Online that reports that the 83-year-old is on his death bed are exaggerated.

Gurecki, who collects and sells Manson memorabilia often posts apparent phone calls with Manson on his YouTube channel.

In the recorded call from Corcoran State Prison, California, Gurecki asks Manson, “What’s happening?” to which he replies: “Solid as a rock, solid as a soul… roll wheel, roll.”

Manson then replied “pretty good” when asked how he was doing.

 Ben Gurecki claims to be a close friend of Manson's
Ben Gurecki claims to be a close friend of Manson’s

Later in the long and rambling conversation Manson rants about an unknown package, saying: “The small people that are trying to get big they tear everything up that we struggled for.

“We did all this on death row, that’s what the package was all about, but the cowards gave the package to the other side because they won’t stand up for our side.”

Much of the call is inaudible but at some point Manson tells Gurecki: “You learn a lot in jail, you don’t tell somebody I’m gonna beat your a**, unless you can do it and get away with it… you say you’re gonna beat they’re a** and you can’t and they beat your ass for saying that.

He adds: “Don’t be faking, that’s it I don’t like lying. I mean I can lie like anyone else, but I know it doesn’t do me no good.”

 Gurecki collects and sells Manson memorabilia like this original Manson police report
Gurecki collects and sells Manson memorabilia like this original Manson police report

Meanwhile Red Wolf, who also says he talks to Manson on the phone regularly, told Sun Online the reports he was close to death were unreliable – and that the 83-year-old had been taken to hospital a few times for “tests and procedures” in the past few months.

Red Wolf, who is part of the pro-Manson environmental group ATWA, said: “The policy of the prison prohibits revealing of inmate health conditions and medical histories….Sadly, Charlie’s friends and associates are essentially left in the dark until he finds an opportunity to tell us himself, which is not easily done.

“He has no access to phone usage while in the hospital, and the CDCR does not allow visitation while inmates are outside of prison grounds.”

 Manson inspired a group of followers to murder seven people in 1969
Manson inspired a group of followers to murder seven people in 1969

He said the recent reports that Manson had a heart problem and only days to live were “false and unsubstantiated”.

“No one outside prison administration and hospital staff has communication with CM [Charles Manson] currently,” Red Wolf added.

“The person, who gave all those grossly exaggerated and overtly morbid statements, has not had contact with Charlie for some time, to the best of our assessment.

“Heart failure is not a known condition affecting CM’s health… The last associate and close friend to converse with Charlie was Black Wolf [a fellow ATWA member], who visited him two Saturdays ago.

“CM has been to the hospital a few times since January for tests and procedures.”

He added however that “death is not something feared” by Manson.

Manson began to gather small group of young, largely female devotees – mainly from broken middle-class homes – known as the “Manson Family” in around 1967.

 Manson, pictured entering court, was charged with seven counts of murder and one count of conspiracy
Manson, pictured entering court, was charged with seven counts of murder and one count of conspiracy

In the summer of 1969, he directed his followers to murder in what was part of a plan to incite a race war, according to prosecutors.

He ordered four of his followers – Susan Atkins, Linda Kasabian, Patricia Krenwinkel and Charles ‘Tex’ Watson – to the Beverly Hills address of movie actress Sharon Tate with the instruction to kill everyone inside.

Less than 24 hours later, the gang tortured, murdered and mutilated wealthy LA couple Rosemary and Leno LaBianca.

They used their blood to write “Rise,” “Death to Pigs,” and “Helter Skelter,” a reference to the Beatles song, on the walls and refrigerator door.

Manson and his accomplices were all sent down for the murders, apart from Kasabian who testified against them and played no direct part in the killings.

Manson was originally sentenced to death but was spared execution and his sentence was converted to life in prison after the California Supreme Court declared the death penalty unconstitutional in that state.

 

 

 

Article source: https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/4940177/charles-manson-says-he-is-in-good-health-in-taped-prison-phone-call-to-pal-before-being-taken-to-hospital/

To Your Good Health: CoolSculpting not a health solution, just an aesthetic one

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column when possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803. Newsletters may be ordered from www.rbmamall.com

Article source: http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/to-your-good-health-coolsculpting-not-a-health-solution-just/article_3d96a55e-d6b9-5682-b7b5-10a7c7c1c3fa.html

Missing 13-year-old Cleveland teen found ‘in good health’


Alexshia Santiago- photo from Cleveland police

Article source: http://fox8.com/2017/11/18/missing-13-year-old-cleveland-teen-found-in-good-health/

Your Good Health: Low blood pressure needs more investigation

Dear Dr. Roach: Our 37-year-old daughter has Addison’s disease. We have had some difficulty trying to regulate her electrolytes and her blood pressure, which is always low, sometimes extremely so. She has known about it for 10 years now. What can one do besides try to stay hydrated to keep the pressure up? Last evening, her blood pressure was 95/58 with a pulse of 88. She is on steroids for life.

L.M.

Addison’s disease is caused by destruction of the part of the adrenal gland that makes cortisone. This leads to a deficiency of that hormone, which is necessary for the body’s response to stress, and which also is partially involved in salt and water metabolism.

Adrenal insufficiency is most often caused by autoimmune disease, but rarely it can be caused by tuberculosis or a hemorrhage into the gland. In some cases, the adrenal gland is normal, and it is the pituitary gland or the hypothalamus in the brain that fails to send the signal that hormone is needed.

Cortisone is the steroid most often used for treatment. There are several different families of steroids. Corticosteroids are named after cortisone, which reduces inflammation, increases blood sugar and has complex effects on protein metabolism.

Cortisone also has some mineralocorticoid effects, which makes the kidney hold on to sodium and lose potassium. (These steroids are completely different from anabolic steroids, like testosterone, which promote bone and muscle growth.) Under periods of high stress — say, surgery or serious illness — people need more cortisone.

A blood pressure of 95/58 is low, but in the normal range for some people. It might have nothing to do with her adrenal insufficiency. However, the difficulty you report with her electrolytes makes me suspect that she might not be getting enough mineralocorticoid.

Although some people get enough from the cortisone they take, others need to take additional mineralocorticoid, such as fludrocortisone. Some people can do fine with just taking in some extra salt and water. She should consult with her endocrinologist, or whoever is treating her Addison’s disease.

 

Dear Dr. Roach: I am a 68-year-old male. In 2004 I had an EBT heart scan, followed by a second two years later due to concerns with high cholesterol. Later I learned of the intensity of the radiation from these treatments.

Never at any point in time during the application or process or in the advertisement was the high level of radiation associated with CT scans mentioned. Should the patient be forewarned about the intensity of radiation with these scans, and shouldn’t advertisers be made to include a warning about the increased cancer risk from these intense radiation treatments?

G.W.S.

Radiation is a potential harm from any procedure using X-rays, including a CT scan. This is not true of an MRI (which uses magnetic waves) or ultrasound or sonogram (those use sound waves).

I wouldn’t describe the dose of radiation as “high”: For a calcium score heart scan, it’s about 3 mSv (millisievert, the standard unit for radiation dosage), which is equivalent to roughly 30 chest X-rays.

You get the equivalent of a chest X-ray’s radiation every 10 days from natural sources, such as cosmic rays and radioactive decay from naturally occurring building compounds.

A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis is about 20 mSv.

The risk of developing a cancer from the radiation due to imaging procedures is very small, but I can’t say it’s zero. Medical tests should be obtained only when there is a good chance of changing treatment based on results.

Men getting radiation treatment for prostate cancer might get 50,000 mSv, 2,500 times the dose of your scan.

This high dose is associated with perhaps a five per cent chance of developing a cancer due to radiation over 25 years.

 

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

Article source: http://www.timescolonist.com/life/health/your-good-health-low-blood-pressure-needs-more-investigation-1.23097153

Family medicine physician and author bringing good health to Southcoast

FAIRHAVEN – Family medicine physician Dr. Kevin Gendreau is on a quest for wellbeing – his own and his patients’ – and he wouldn’t want to practice medicine anywhere but close to home.

Gendreau, after studying in Philadelphia and completing his residency in Boston, recently came home to set up his practice.

It’s a fitting return for a man who was born 30 years ago at Charlton Memorial Hospital in Fall River, and is now practicing at the Fairhaven site of Southcoast Health, the entity that runs Charlton.

“I was born and raised in Fall River,” Gendreau said. “I always knew I would be back.”

Gendreau said the prevention of disease will be his main goal for his patients, just as it is for himself.

Gendreau weighed 300 pounds just a year ago, and was struggling with high cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar, and elevated liver enzymes.

“Through my years in medical school and my residency, I ate through the struggles,” Gendreau said. “I put on 100 pounds.”

Using his medical knowledge, he made a health decision and ditched the processed foods.

“I essentially eat as raw as possible,” Gendreau said.

The weight – three to five pounds per week – came off through the months.

“Once I made the decision, everything fell into place,” Gendreau said.

Today, he’s down to 200 pounds and has “cured” his high-risk numbers. He plans to lose another 30 to 50 pounds to bring him to an ideal weight.

Weight loss is one of Gendreau’s clinical interests, along with dermatology, behavioral pediatrics and adolescent medicine.

His interest in becoming a physician started young, when his father was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma, a skin cancer that began from a small mole. His dad died from the condition three years later at the age of 50. Gendreau was a teenager at the time.

Gendreau said if the mole had been examined sooner, his dad might not have lost his life.

“That’s really what made me want to be a doctor,” Gendreau said.

His first experience in medicine was volunteering in the Charlton Emergency Department at a teenager. He later worked as a safety sitter and in patient transport.

Gendreau received his bachelor’s degree at Boston University and his medical degree at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Gendreau completed his residency in family medicine at Cambridge Health Alliance and Carney Hospital through Tufts University.

He also researched prostate cancer and received an Honorarium from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

He has helped run a free clinic in Malden for uninsured patients and is an author who is engaged in early childhood literacy initiatives.

Gendreau, besides losing his dad at a young age, has also lost his sister. He said she passed away in June of last year at the age of 33 from a type of ovarian cancer.

While dealing with his loss is difficult, he remembers his sister cheering him on through his weight loss journey, and holds his memories close.

His personal experiences are one reason he wants to be close to home.

“I’m very close to my family,” Gendreau said.

He also believes he can make a difference in this little corner of Massachusetts.

“There’s a need in this area for primary care doctors,” Gendreau said. “I’m seeing at least 10 new patients a day.”

It’s rare today for physicians to practice so close to their hometown, at least in this area.

Gendreau is one of just 14 Fall River-born physicians practicing at Southcoast Health, according to Southcoast Health spokesman Pete Cohenno.

Another of Gendreau’s goals in his new practice is to offer a weight loss group.

An author, he’s also working on his second children’s book.

Gendreau’s first book, “A Healthier You with Sophia and Sue,” teaches children, ages 4 to 6, in a fun way about being healthy . It’s available on Amazon.

His second children’s book, “Queen Celine’s Vaccine Machine” will tell kids about why they need vaccines in a “really whimsical” way. He’s currently looking for a publisher.

For now though, Gendreau plans to devote his full attention to his new practice.

“I’m excited,” Gendreau said. “I love it here. Southcoast in general has been good to me.”

Gendreau is practicing with the group at the Southcoast Center for Primary Specialty Care, 208 Mill Road, Fairhaven. New patients are being accepted. They can call 508-758-3781 or visit www.southcoast.org.

 

Email Deborah Allard at dallard@heraldnews.com

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.heraldnews.com/news/20171117/family-medicine-physician-and-author-bringing-good-health-to-southcoast

Sammamish Good Health to host weekly comedy shows to say ‘thank you and goodbye’

Sammamish isn’t exactly known for being the central comedy spot in Washington.

But this December it will be.

Sammamish businessman Jeremy Horn plans to turn his vitamin and supplement shop, Good Health, into a a regular comedy club every Thursday next month as a way to say thank you to the Sammamish community, as Good Health will close after 15 years in business.

“I think this could be a really exciting community event and I am extremely happy to turn something positive out of an otherwise distressing situation,” Horn said. “It is my way of saying ‘Thank you’ to all our long-standing customers.”

Horn, himself, has performed stand-up comedy since 2004-05, back when Giggles Comedy Club was the top 10 in the country, he said.

“By the time I finished college, it was in the bottom 10,” he said.

But during that time and beyond, Horn’s been able to make some pretty valuable connections and friendships. It’s what allowed him to get top-level acts for his series of shows.

“This is not amateur night,” he said. “Even comics are excited about these shows.”

Although Horn won’t be performing, headliners, such as Andrew Rivers, son of long-time Seattle radio personality Bob Rivers, and Kermet Apio, who does the opening act for Brian Regan, are just a couple of the 30 acts Horn has booked. Other local comedians include Geoff Young, Geoff Lott, Jim Killner, Monica Nevi and Brett Hamil.

Special guests Drew Barth with Kiro Radio and the Dori Monson Show; Rick Kunkler with Last Comic Standing and Jimmy Kimmel Live; and Chris Cashman with The 206, Up Late Northwest and King 5 News, are also slated to make an appearance.

“A lot are coming into town for the holidays to see friends and family,” Horn said. “We’re going to have tons of special guests coming by.”

Horn said he’s been overwhelmed by the response from comedians.

“I’ve had to turn away another 25, which is frustrating to for me because these are all people I’d love to have, there’s just no space,” Horn said.

When Lott first learned of the comedy shows, he said his first thought was, “Anything I can do to help Jeremy, I’m in.”

“He’s a true sparkplug in Seattle comedy, great energy to be around, funny and truly cares about his fellow comedians and the scene,” Lott said. “That’s likely why the shows are so stacked with really funny, great comedians.”

Rivers said he’s known Horn for a while and, as a comic who is frequently around germs while touring, he’s reached out to Horn several times for tips on how to take care of himself.

“We don’t get many sick days,” Rivers joked. “So, it’s only right I can help return the favor.”

Rivers also echoed Horn’s awe of the lineup scheduled.

“The lineup is fantastic for all of the shows,” he said. “But don’t take my word for it. Google some of the comics on YouTube and see the quality Seattle’s comedy scene brings to the table. This is a great way to support comedy and local business.”

Because of Washington state event laws, in order for Horn to provide food and drinks, yes alcoholic, the event is considered a private event – meaning Good Health members only. But, he said, all that requires is signing up for a $12 annual membership, which can be done at the door or online. The membership guarantees entry to all four shows as well as free food and drink.

Pine Lake Pizza will be on-hand for deliveries and sponsored snacks and beverages will be available.

About 50 seats and standing room will be available each night. Horn expects the show, which starts at 7:30 p.m., to last about one-and-a-half hours – just enough time for working parents to be home on time for the babysitter.

Good Health is located at 3050 Issaquah-Pine Lake Road SE in Sammamish.

For more information or to become a member of Good Health (and gain admission to the comedy shows), visit www.everythingyou.com.

A list of performers are as follows:

Dec. 7

Headliners:

Jim Kellner – Comedy Hynotist

Brett Hamil – Columnist and Cartoonist for City Arts Magazine

Opening Acts:

Heneghen

Cris Rodriguez

Rachel Leigh

Josh Firestine

Todd Kirkwood

Nick Decktor

Dec. 4

Headliner:

Andrew Rivers – Laughs on Fox, The 206, Son of long-time Seattle Radio personality Bob Rivers

Opening Acts:

Edi Z

Heneghen

Stephanie Flynn

Daniel Isherwood

Danny Littlejohn

Dec. 21

Headliners:

Kermet Apio – Evening at the Improv, Star Search, Almost Live, Opening Act for Brian Regan

Geoff Young

Opening Acts:

Geoff Brousseau

Lisa Wallen

Joe Grienauer

Aaron Fishbein

Dec. 28

Headliner:

Geoff Lott – Finalist for Best of Washington

Opening Acts:

Monica Nevi

Brent Flyberg

Mike Masilotti

Andrew Merklinghaus

Brandon Valentine

Special Guests:

Drew Barth – Kiro Radio, The Dori Monson Show

Rick Kunkler – Last Comic Standing, Jimmy Kimmel Live

Chris Cashman – The 206, Up Late Northwest, King 5 News

*And others not yet announced*

Brett HamilBrett Hamil

Brett Hamil

Monica NeviMonica Nevi

Monica Nevi

Rick KunklerRick Kunkler

Rick Kunkler


Article source: http://www.bellevuereporter.com/life/sammamish-good-health-to-host-weekly-comedy-shows-to-say-thank-you-and-goodbye/

Nutrition Talk: Fiber contributes much to good health


Constance Roark / Dietitian Nutritionist

Fiber. It is the unsung hero of nutrition. While it’s technically not a nutrient, it’s an important part of good health. It’s best known for maintaining regularity, but let’s be honest, this is a topic most of us are not eager to discuss with friends and co-workers. Yet, we don’t hesitate to engage in passionate if not heated conversations about the ideal protein source or what constitutes a healthy fat. While it’s true that fiber is important to keep things “moving,” its benefits extend well beyond that and are worth talking about.

Fiber has been associated with reducing the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and some cancers, lowering cholesterol levels, supporting weight management and maintaining good gut health. For optimal health, the daily recommended amount of fiber is 30-38 grams for men and 20-25 grams for women. Sadly, the average American gets only about 15 grams.

Fiber is predominantly found in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds and falls into two categories, soluble and insoluble, which refers to whether or not it dissolves in water. Most foods contain a combination, but some foods tend to be higher in one form over the other and all fiber passes through our bodies without being absorbed or digested.

Soluble fiber absorbs water, creating a gel-like substance that has been associated with lowering cholesterol and controlling blood sugar levels, both important for maintaining heart health and reducing the risk of Type 2 diabetes. Common sources of soluble fiber include beans, oats, barley and flax seeds. Conversely, insoluble fiber, found in whole wheat, popcorn and in the skins of fruits and vegetables, doesn’t absorb water and promotes the movement of material through your digestive tract and prevents constipation.

When it comes to our guts, fiber might be a hero. In addition to keeping us regular, it is the food of choice for the healthy bacteria that live in our intestines (otherwise known as prebiotics), which are essential to maintaining good gut health. Fiber may also be important in our fight against colon cancer. This past month a study found an association between a fiber-rich diet and increased survival rates in those with non-metastatic colon cancer — meaning the cancer hadn’t spread to other parts of the body. The researchers found that for every 5 gram increase in dietary fiber the risk of dying decreased by nearly 25 percent. However, the study does not prove that increased fiber was the reason for living longer, only that there was an association.

Other studies have shown a connection between fiber-rich foods and reduced inflammation. What isn’t clear is whether it is the fiber alone or that fiber-rich foods tend to be high in other important nutrients that fight inflammation, such as antioxidants and phytonutrients, or a combination of these factors. Either way, it is compelling and one of the reasons it is recommended that we aim to get our daily fiber from food sources versus supplements.

Getting more fiber in your diet doesn’t have to be complicated. Add some rolled oats to your morning smoothie, red beans to your lunchtime salad, a generous helping of veggies to your dinner and a piece of fruit and nuts for a snack. If you’ve been lacking in this area, you might want to increase your intake slowly to avoid any gastrointestinal distress, and always be sure to drink plenty of water. By giving fiber a more prominent position on your plate you’ll be doing more for your health than just maintaining regularity. And, who knows, it might even become the subject of your next water cooler conversation.

Constance Roark is a registered dietitian nutritionist and the president and founder of CMR Solutions. Visit cmrsolutionsllc.com.

Article source: http://www.fortmorgantimes.com/lifestyles/ci_31456982/nutrition-talk-fiber-contributes-much-good-health

US Tells Ankara Iran-Sanctions-Case Suspect In ‘Good Health’

Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Bekir Bozdag says Washington has told Ankara that jailed Turkish-Iranian businessman Reza Zarrab — a gold trader who is awaiting trial in the United States on charges of evading U.S. sanctions against Iran — is in good medical condition.

Bozdag made the remarks on November 16, a day after Turkey announced it had sent a diplomatic note to U.S. authorities inquiring about Zarrab.

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons website last week listed Zarrab, 34, as having been released from prison on November 8. But U.S. prosecutors said that posting was an error and he remained in jail.

Turkish leaders have pressed repeatedly for the release of Zarrab, who has close ties to the government of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Erdogan and other Turkish leaders have raised the issue directly with the White House.

Media reports last week said U.S. special prosecutor Robert Mueller is investigating whether Turkish officials discussed paying former national security adviser Michael Flynn $15 million to secure Zarrab’s release and to allow the deportation of Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric residing in the United States who Erdogan accuses of engineering Turkey’s failed July 2016 coup.

Zarrab, taken into U.S. custody in March 2016, has hired former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani to negotiate with U.S. authorities to try to obtain his release through political and diplomatic channels.

A spokesman for acting U.S. Attorney Joon Kim in Manhattan confirmed on November 14 that Zarrab remained in federal custody in the United States.

“The information that Zarrab was released is not factual,” Zarrab’s lawyer Seyda Yildirim told Turkey’s Hurriyet newspaper on November 15.

“He might have been moved to a different section. We haven’t been informed in five days,” Yildirim said.

Hurriyet quoted a diplomatic source as saying that Turkey, in its formal diplomatic note, had asked U.S. authorities to make clear where Zarrab was being held and to give assurances about his health and security.

Zarrab has pleaded not guilty to the Iran sanctions evasion charges against him and a co-defendant, Mehmet Hakan Atilla, an executive at the Turkish lender Halkbank. Their trial is due start in New York on November 27.

Erdogan has accused U.S. prosecutors of having “ulterior motives” in the case by including references to him and his wife in court papers.

Zarrab, a wealthy businessman who is married to a well-known Turkish pop singer, was linked to a corruption scandal that swirled around Erdogan and his deputies when Erdogan was Turkish prime minister in 2013.

Zarrab spent 70 days in custody in Turkey at the time, but all suspects arrested in the judicial probe were subsequently released. Erdogan at the time denounced the allegations as a plot by Gulen to bring down his government.

With reporting by AP, AFP, and Reuters

Article source: https://www.rferl.org/a/turkey-inquires-zarrab-turkish-iranian-businessman-awaiting-trial-us-iran-sanctions-case/28856798.html

Confusing myeloma diagnosis needs more communication

Dear Dr. Roach • My son (early 40s) has been romantically involved with a woman (early 30s) for the past two years. She has always been underweight but seems to be in good health. She has a history of endometrial cancer and has had no recurrence since treatment. Now she has been diagnosed with myeloma. Her treatment consists of blood transfusions when needed. This is a delicate situation, and I am having difficulty learning more about this form of cancer, other than through online searches. I have questions about treatment options, lifestyle changes, prognosis, fertility, longevity — all the biggies. Your input would be greatly appreciated. — M.T.

Answer • Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer of the cells that make antibodies. Myeloma is very unusual at her age: Less than 2 percent of people are diagnosed before age 40, with half of people being over the age of 66 at diagnosis. It is unusual enough that I would be concerned about the diagnosis being a possible mistake.

Two conditions can be mistaken for multiple myeloma: smoldering myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS). These conditions often are not treated, as opposed to multiple myeloma, which needs effective treatment. Without effective treatment for someone with multiple myeloma, only half of people will live more than six months.

Treatment for a young person ideally would be an autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation. Often called a bone marrow transplant, this procedure takes the person’s own healthy cells and gives them back after high-dose chemotherapy. There are several new approaches, with more-effective and less-toxic treatments available, yet HCT remains the best chance for cure. Not everyone is a candidate for it. Pregnancy is possible, but rare, after this treatment.

I don’t understand the treatment you describe. Blood transfusions are not effective for myeloma and are not usually needed for smoldering myeloma or MGUS. I can provide some general information about myeloma, but to find out about her individual prognosis, you need to ask her or your son, who surely must have talked to her about these issues.

The combination of early endometrial cancer and early myeloma has been reported: People with a history of endometrial cancer are at higher risk for myeloma.

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

Article source: http://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/health/to-your-good-health/confusing-myeloma-diagnosis-needs-more-communication/article_fe663d91-0fb4-5eb4-acdb-c7056ac7b81d.html

Nutrition Talk: Fiber contributes much to good health


Fiber. It is the unsung hero of nutrition. While it’s technically not a nutrient, it’s an important part of good health. It’s best known for maintaining regularity, but let’s be honest, this is a topic most of us are not eager to discuss with friends and co-workers. Yet, we don’t hesitate to engage in passionate if not heated conversations about the ideal protein source or what constitutes a healthy fat. While it’s true that fiber is important to keep things “moving,” its benefits extend well beyond that and are worth talking about.

Fiber has been associated with reducing the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and some cancers, lowering cholesterol levels, supporting weight management and maintaining good gut health. For optimal health, the daily recommended amount of fiber is 30-38 grams for men and 20-25 grams for women. Sadly, the average American gets only about 15 grams.

Fiber is predominantly found in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds and falls into two categories, soluble and insoluble, which refers to whether or not it dissolves in water. Most foods contain a combination, but some foods tend to be higher in one form over the other and all fiber passes through our bodies without being absorbed or digested.

Soluble fiber absorbs water, creating a gel-like substance that has been associated with lowering cholesterol and controlling blood sugar levels, both important for maintaining heart health and reducing the risk of Type 2 diabetes. Common sources of soluble fiber include beans, oats, barley and flax seeds. Conversely, insoluble fiber, found in whole wheat, popcorn and in the skins of fruits and vegetables, doesn’t absorb water and promotes the movement of material through your digestive tract and prevents constipation.

When it comes to our guts, fiber might be a hero. In addition to keeping us regular, it is the food of choice for the healthy bacteria that live in our intestines (otherwise known as prebiotics), which are essential to maintaining good gut health. Fiber may also be important in our fight against colon cancer. This past month a study found an association between a fiber-rich diet and increased survival rates in those with non-metastatic colon cancer — meaning the cancer hadn’t spread to other parts of the body. The researchers found that for every 5 gram increase in dietary fiber the risk of dying decreased by nearly 25 percent. However, the study does not prove that increased fiber was the reason for living longer, only that there was an association.

Other studies have shown a connection between fiber-rich foods and reduced inflammation. What isn’t clear is whether it is the fiber alone or that fiber-rich foods tend to be high in other important nutrients that fight inflammation, such as antioxidants and phytonutrients, or a combination of these factors. Either way, it is compelling and one of the reasons it is recommended that we aim to get our daily fiber from food sources versus supplements.

Getting more fiber in your diet doesn’t have to be complicated. Add some rolled oats to your morning smoothie, red beans to your lunchtime salad, a generous helping of veggies to your dinner and a piece of fruit and nuts for a snack. If you’ve been lacking in this area, you might want to increase your intake slowly to avoid any gastrointestinal distress, and always be sure to drink plenty of water. By giving fiber a more prominent position on your plate you’ll be doing more for your health than just maintaining regularity. And, who knows, it might even become the subject of your next water cooler conversation.

Constance Roark is a registered dietitian nutritionist and the president and founder of CMR Solutions. Visit cmrsolutionsllc.com.

Article source: http://www.dailycamera.com/lifestyles/ci_31454183/nutrition-talk-constance-roark-fiber