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Experts offer tips for employers, workers to reduce stress

Public relations director Rick Wollman holds an architects rendering as work continues on the Advising Center and academic building construction projects Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014, at Sioux City’s Morningside College.

Article source: http://siouxcityjournal.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/experts-offer-tips-for-employers-workers-to-reduce-stress/article_92b21ce0-3d07-5f85-b9f1-1154d72fbdc1.html

Brain health tips from multi-talented star Hector Elizondo

As the homeless population grows and rents balloon in San Diego, city officials Thursday announced a series of proposals to help alleviate the housing shortage over the next 10 years.

Article source: http://www.cbs8.com/story/36421192/brain-health-tips-from-multi-talented-star-hector-elizondo

For moms, mental health is everything

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Mom Alia Dastagir encourages moms to talk about parenting struggles.
USA TODAY

I love my daughter. I don’t always love being a mother.

I’m exhausted most days. The bulk of the games my 2-year-old demands I play are so boring I could cry. She’s diminutive, but still puts me in a firm headlock when I try to leave her room each night. Getting her into the bath is practically a hostage negotiation. And that look she gives me when she dumps her dinner on the floor — what is that? I swear it’s voodoo.

Loving Atika is visceral, chemical, exquisite. But raising her can be tedious and depleting. If we suggest being a mother means we must be joyful all, or even most, of the time, we do all mothers a disservice. Motherhood is remarkably difficult. Acknowledging that and taking care of our mental health is as important as taking care of our babies.

More: Mom of twin boys says this keeps her stress, anxiety under control

More: Mom shares 3 tips for becoming more confident

More: ‘Breast is best’ mom confesses she uses formula

The facts:

Mental health won’t look the same for every mom, especially if there’s a clinical diagnosis. I didn’t have PPD nor am I suffering from depression, but I do struggle with anxiety. (I’m not taking medication, but if I felt I needed it, I would.) Here are three ways I try to keep myself mentally healthy:

If I’m not fine, I don’t pretend to be: Recognize it’s OK to talk candidly about the hard stuff. The guilt. I have guilt right now, writing a column that will live in perpetuity which my daughter may one day read and misunderstand. I feel guilty for missing the life I had before she was born. I feel guilty for missing the moments of levity between me and her dad that are so much less frequent since she arrived.

I’ve got my spirit mamas: It doesn’t have to be a tribe, but you do need people in your life you can be vulnerable with. Mom friends. An online community. A therapist. If you’re raising your kid(s) with a partner, lean on him or her. The more you talk, the more you realize you’re not alone.

I try to keep perspective: On days when it feels like you’re failing at everything (you missed a deadline, the toddler ate Werther’s Originals for dinner), remember that even when you’re down on yourself, your kids likely aren’t down on you. Unconditional love goes both ways.

Moms deal with a lot — and not just in the realm of discovering poop in peculiar places. We struggle with everything from poor parental leave policies to motherhood penalties at work to stigmas around breastfeeding. To survive in this world, and to have the energy to better it for our kids, we need to care for ourselves.

I might not always love being a mother, but I love myself. There’s no better way to show it than by prioritizing my mental health.

If you’re struggling with postpartum depression (PPD), seek help from a health care professional right away. If you’re not sure if you have PPD, take this online quiz and bring it with you to your appointment.

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CLOSEPRACTICAL VIDEOS ABOUT HEALTH… FOR MOMS BY MOMS
Mom Bod: Confessions of a breastfeeding mom | 1:00

Ashley May, a journalist at USA TODAY, shares how she’s meeting her breastfeeding goals.
USA TODAY

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CLOSEPRACTICAL VIDEOS ABOUT HEALTH… FOR MOMS BY MOMS
Mom Bod: Tips for getting those recommended daily steps | 0:56

Michelle Washington, managing editor for STUDIO Gannett, makes time for walking 5 miles a day by getting a good night’s sleep, joining fitness challenges and making herself a priority.
Mom Bod

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CLOSEPRACTICAL VIDEOS ABOUT HEALTH… FOR MOMS BY MOMS
Mom Bod: How to balance work and parenting responsibilities | 0:56

Nanci Bergman, mom to 9-year-old Dalton and CEO of ACCENT, says prioritized to-do lists help her stay on task.

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CLOSEPRACTICAL VIDEOS ABOUT HEALTH… FOR MOMS BY MOMS
Mom Bod: Mom of toddler shares her secret to confidence | 0:59

A South Carolina mom says her side business gave her a boost of confidence she needed.

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CLOSEPRACTICAL VIDEOS ABOUT HEALTH… FOR MOMS BY MOMS
Mom Bod: Babywearing can be its own workout | 1:10

Mary Nahorniak says babywearing helped her lose post-baby weight. She demonstrates three real-world movements she incorporates into her walks with Alice.
Ashley May

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CLOSEPRACTICAL VIDEOS ABOUT HEALTH… FOR MOMS BY MOMS
Mom Bod: Mother of twins shares her stress-relieving secret | 0:51

Cynthia Robinson, senior operations editor at USA TODAY, advises moms of all ages to find their happy place.
Ashley May

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CLOSEPRACTICAL VIDEOS ABOUT HEALTH… FOR MOMS BY MOMS
Mom Bod: These meal prep tips will save your weeknights | 1:00

Cara Richardson, senior digital editor at USA TODAY, tells how she saves time through the week by planning and preparing meals ahead.
Ashley May, Mom Bod

  • Mom Bod: Confessions of a breastfeeding mom
  • Mom Bod: Tips for getting those recommended daily steps
  • Mom Bod: How to balance work and parenting responsibilities
  • Mom Bod: Mom of toddler shares her secret to confidence
  • Mom Bod: Babywearing can be its own workout
  • Mom Bod: Mother of twins shares her stress-relieving secret
  • Mom Bod: These meal prep tips will save your weeknights

Mom Bod is a USA TODAY video series featuring tips from moms on fitness, nutrition and mental health. The goal? Let’s be real about the struggle to “healthy” and learn to love our mom bods.

Article source: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/09/21/moms-mental-health-everything/677653001/

Amazon’s Alexa now offers health advice from the Mayo Clinic

Basic health information and advice provided by the Mayo Clinic is now available on Amazon Alexa-enabled devices. Owners who have downloaded the Mayo Clinic First Aid skill (Amazon’s version of apps) need only voice their concerns to receive answers to dozens of everyday health issues or other self-care instructions.

“Mayo Clinic produces trusted, evidence-based health guidance to empower people to effectively manage their health,” Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, general internal medicine physician and associate medical director at Mayo Clinic Global Business Solutions, said in a statement. “This is the first health guidance skill Mayo Clinic has developed and launched for Amazon Alexa. Voice-enabled experience is a new and growing channel for reaching people and delivering information they are seeking, whether or not they have an existing relationship with Mayo Clinic.”

Users may open the voice-driven platform to access and browse a listing of common health topics. Otherwise, vocally addressing Alexa with the name of the skill and a specific question will prompt a spoken response from the device.

The Mayo Clinic First-Aid skill does not replace medical care and should not be used in emergency situations, the provider cautions. It joins the clinic’s other Amazon Alexa service, Mayo Clinic News Network, which offers listeners a 60-second daily presentation with easy-to-understand health tips.

But the Mayo Clinic is not the only provider of health info in the Amazon Alexa ecosystem. This March, WebMD launched their own integration with the platform to provide users information on a range of health-related topics such as conditions, medication, tests, and treatments. Users of the WebMD skill can have the information read to them aloud, or sent as text to their Alexa app.

“There are a number of reasons that voice-enabled interfaces are growing in popularity — they are generally hands-free, people can talk faster than they type, and when done right, they make it easier for consumers to quickly and easily get to the information they need,” WebMD Vice President Ben Greenberg, whose product team developed the new voice capabilities, said in a statement accompanying the launch.

Other voice-assisted health services available on Amazon Alexa include Fitbit integration, Boston Children’s Hospital’s KidsMD skill, and Healthtap’s Doctor AI diagnosis tool.

Article source: http://www.mobihealthnews.com/content/amazons-alexa-now-offers-health-advice-mayo-clinic

5 Wellness Tips to Help Control Your Multiple Sclerosis

If you have multiple sclerosis (MS), what triggers your symptoms – numbness, muscle weakness, fatigue, blurry vision or other problems – may be a mystery. Stress can play a role. So can infections. You may always be on the lookout for ways to prevent flare-ups.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“Patients with MS often find wellness advice online, but much of it isn’t supported by scientific evidence,” says neurologist Mary Rensel, MD. “It’s easy to become distracted by, and spend too much money on, products or behaviors that may have little or no effect on your MS.”

But more and more scientific research is identifying what truly does temper MS symptoms. Dr. Rensel, Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Multiple Sclerosis Health and Wellness Initiative, has studied recent findings and turned them into wellness recommendations. She says all MS patients should have these five things:

1. A low-salt Mediterranean diet. Most studies agree that the Mediterranean diet — rich in fish, olive oil, whole grains, vegetables and nuts — is an effective anti-inflammatory diet. That makes it a wise choice if you have MS, an inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, Dr. Rensel says. Some research indicates that a Mediterranean-style diet helps maintain brain health and may reduce the risk of MS.

Other studies have found that too much salt in your diet can trigger MS symptoms. “If you have MS, limit sodium to less than 2,000 mg a day,” Dr. Rensel says.

2. At least 150 minutes of moderate movement per week. Regular aerobic exercise can improve fatigue from MS and potentially some brain repair functions. “I recommend that patients with MS follow the same exercise guidelines as the general population as they are able: 150 minutes of moderate movement per week,” Dr. Rensel says. “A combination of aerobic activities and stretching has helped many of my patients improve stamina and reduce MS symptoms.”

3. Vitamin D levels between 40 and 70 ng/mL. Various studies suggest a link between vitamin D and MS. People with higher levels of vitamin D are less likely to develop MS. And people with relapsing MS have lower vitamin D levels than the general population.

“The evidence isn’t clear on how much vitamin D to take, but keeping vitamin D levels in your blood between 40 and 70 ng/mL seems to help minimize disease progression in most studies,” Dr. Rensel says.

4. No smoking or tobacco products. Research shows that smokers have a higher risk of autoimmune conditions, including MS. And smokers with MS have more flare-ups and disability. “If you smoke, ask your doctor to help you quit,” Dr. Rensel says. “Pharmacologic aids like nicotine patches and gum, when added to behavioral programs like quit groups, can improve success rates.”

5. Routine mental health screening. Depression is more common in people with MS. And it can worsen fatigue and cognitive function. One study directly links psychological stress to new MS brain lesions. “Screening and managing psychological conditions, including connecting patients with a mental health professional when needed, improve quality of life and MS outcomes,” Dr. Rensel says.

People with MS should see their primary care provider regularly, in addition to their neurologist, she says.

“PCPs are valuable partners in helping MS patients with these wellness recommendations,” she says.

Article source: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/2017/09/5-wellness-tips-to-help-control-your-multiple-sclerosis/

10 simple weight loss tips

10. Sleep more

Getting your eight hours shut eye is just as important as your diet and exercise regime when it comes to weight loss. In a study by the University of Leeds,  1,615 adults reported how long they slept and kept records of food intake.

Indicators of overall metabolic health such as blood pressure, blood cholesterol, blood sugar, and thyroid function were monitored, as well as weight and waist circumference recorded.

Those who slept for six hours or less a night had waists that were on average 1.1 inches (3cm) larger than those who slept for nine hours.

Article source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-fitness/nutrition/diet/10-simple-weight-loss-tips/

5 Wellness Tips to Help Control Your Multiple Sclerosis – Health …

If you have multiple sclerosis (MS), what triggers your symptoms – numbness, muscle weakness, fatigue, blurry vision or other problems – may be a mystery. Stress can play a role. So can infections. You may always be on the lookout for ways to prevent flare-ups.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“Patients with MS often find wellness advice online, but much of it isn’t supported by scientific evidence,” says neurologist Mary Rensel, MD. “It’s easy to become distracted by, and spend too much money on, products or behaviors that may have little or no effect on your MS.”

But more and more scientific research is identifying what truly does temper MS symptoms. Dr. Rensel, Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Multiple Sclerosis Health and Wellness Initiative, has studied recent findings and turned them into wellness recommendations. She says all MS patients should have these five things:

1. A low-salt Mediterranean diet. Most studies agree that the Mediterranean diet — rich in fish, olive oil, whole grains, vegetables and nuts — is an effective anti-inflammatory diet. That makes it a wise choice if you have MS, an inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, Dr. Rensel says. Some research indicates that a Mediterranean-style diet helps maintain brain health and may reduce the risk of MS.

Other studies have found that too much salt in your diet can trigger MS symptoms. “If you have MS, limit sodium to less than 2,000 mg a day,” Dr. Rensel says.

2. At least 150 minutes of moderate movement per week. Regular aerobic exercise can improve fatigue from MS and potentially some brain repair functions. “I recommend that patients with MS follow the same exercise guidelines as the general population as they are able: 150 minutes of moderate movement per week,” Dr. Rensel says. “A combination of aerobic activities and stretching has helped many of my patients improve stamina and reduce MS symptoms.”

3. Vitamin D levels between 40 and 70 ng/mL. Various studies suggest a link between vitamin D and MS. People with higher levels of vitamin D are less likely to develop MS. And people with relapsing MS have lower vitamin D levels than the general population.

“The evidence isn’t clear on how much vitamin D to take, but keeping vitamin D levels in your blood between 40 and 70 ng/mL seems to help minimize disease progression in most studies,” Dr. Rensel says.

4. No smoking or tobacco products. Research shows that smokers have a higher risk of autoimmune conditions, including MS. And smokers with MS have more flare-ups and disability. “If you smoke, ask your doctor to help you quit,” Dr. Rensel says. “Pharmacologic aids like nicotine patches and gum, when added to behavioral programs like quit groups, can improve success rates.”

5. Routine mental health screening. Depression is more common in people with MS. And it can worsen fatigue and cognitive function. One study directly links psychological stress to new MS brain lesions. “Screening and managing psychological conditions, including connecting patients with a mental health professional when needed, improve quality of life and MS outcomes,” Dr. Rensel says.

People with MS should see their primary care provider regularly, in addition to their neurologist, she says.

“PCPs are valuable partners in helping MS patients with these wellness recommendations,” she says.

Article source: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/2017/09/5-wellness-tips-to-help-control-your-multiple-sclerosis/

5 Health Tips for Young Women – Boston Magazine

Presented by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Photo credit: Getty Images

These tips are presented by Aisling Lydeard, WHNP from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

What is the HPV (Human papillomavirus) vaccine and why should you get one? 

The HPV vaccine is the only vaccine known to protect against cancer including cervical, vulva, vaginal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV can be transmitted to the vagina and cervix through sexual activity. The best time to vaccinate is prior to sexual activity between the ages of 11-12 for boys and girls. However, if you did not receive the vaccine at a young age it is still beneficial to receive up to the age of 26, even if you’ve had an HPV infection or abnormal pap smear, as it can provide protection against strains you may not have been exposed to.

How often do I need a Pap smear?

Pap smear testing is an important part of preventing cervical cancer because it can pick up early abnormal changes in the cells on your cervix that could progress to cancer if left untreated. Your initial pap smear should be performed at 21 years old and if the test is normal, repeated every three years until 30 years old. At age 30, you should receive a combined test including a Pap smear and high-risk HPV test to determine how frequently you should be screened in your thirties.

What’s the best type of contraception for me?

Contraception is not “one size fits all.” The wonderful thing about contraception of our day and age is that we have many varieties to fit individual lifestyle needs. Many younger women are choosing longer acting methods such as an IUD (hormonal or non-hormonal contraceptive device placed in the uterus) or implant (4 mm progesterone rod implanted in the arm) versus the more traditional birth control pill, patch, injection, or ring. IUDs available today have a smaller diameter and an extremely low number of hormones that work very well for adolescents. One appealing feature of a long acting method for young women is that you don’t have to remember to take a daily pill or change a patch­–once the device is in place, there is no work on your part. The key is to talk with your gynecologist so that you can understand the pros and cons of all methods and choose the method best for you and your lifestyle.

How do I find the right gynecologist with whom I’m comfortable?

Finding a gynecologist that you are comfortable being open and honest with is the most important component. Friends and families are often great sources for recommendations. Ask people you are close to if they have a gynecologist that they have a good relationship with. You can find provider profiles on hospital and health center websites and will be able to see their training and interests. You can also search for a gynecologist who has clinical interests and specializes in something that might be an issue for you like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pelvic pain, or sexual dysfunction.

What’s the most important thing to know about my sexual health?

Education and protection is key! It is important to educate yourself about prevention (read about the HPV vaccine, talk to your health care provider, etc.) Have open and honest communication with your gynecologist about your sexual health and relationships so that you can be aware of diseases and risks in order to have healthy relationships.

For more information on women’s health, turn to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center by visiting www.bidmc.org.

Article source: http://www.bostonmagazine.com/sponsor-content/health-tips-young-women/

Supplements and Health Tips That Will Improve Your Mindset

Starting a business is stressful. You’re wearing a million different hats trying to establish and grow your business, and there are always going to be unexpected challenges and obstacles that put a strain on your objectives. As a result, many entrepreneurs have to work long hours — often, while keeping their day job — battle uncertainty and still do great work.

That’s why it’s important to try to do other things in your life to help relieve some of that strain. By living a healthy lifestyle — exercising, eating right and so on — you’ll have more energy and positivity to help you jump any hurdle in your way. That’s why Entrepreneur Network partner Ben Angel breaks down a few quick tips on how to treat your body right while you’re building your business.

Click play to learn more.

Related: How to Trick Your Brain to Love Criticism

Entrepreneur Network is a premium video network providing entertainment, education and inspiration from successful entrepreneurs and thought leaders. We provide expertise and opportunities to accelerate brand growth and effectively monetize video and audio content distributed across all digital platforms for the business genre.

EN is partnered with hundreds of top YouTube channels in the business vertical. Watch video from our network partners on demand on Amazon FireRokuApple TV and the Entrepreneur App available on iOS and Android devices.

Click here to become a part of this growing video network.

Article source: https://www.entrepreneur.com/video/300498

Ten tips to rescue your health from social media

Most of you reading this will be within a metre of your smartphone and a minute or two from checking one of the omnipotent social media platforms enveloping our lives. While we know that chronic use of these platforms can have a negative health impact, is it really time to hit the ‘Delete Account’ button? Dr Nick Knight delivers ten rescue tips to making sure your health remains bolstered, and not battered, by social media.

The (online) elephant in the room: social media can be bad

To know the right steps to take with social media, you need to know where the wrong steps can take you. With that in mind, let us briefly summarise some of the main physical and mental health concerns generated from excessive social media use. These include:

* Generating lower self-esteem when you compare your real life to others’ virtual lives
* Being a source of significant distraction from your much more important offline life
* Triggering physical health issues such as posture-related muscular strain and eye fatigue
* Interfering with quality sleep by disturbing your circadian rhythm (your body clock)
* Encouraging addictive tendencies that compound all of the above

The science of reward

Social media use is all about triggering your reward centre in your brain. This reward system comprises complex neural structures and pathways in the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop. I know. Basically, like any addictive drug, your Likes, Retweets, Comments and Followers act like a giant neuroendocrine shovel pouring dopamine (your neuroendocrine neurotransmitter that feeds on pleasure and reward) into your brain’s reward centre. Quite simply, you are left wanting more and more. Just think about when you’ve finished exercising, had amazing sex or achieved a goal, and you get that rush – that’s your dopamine.

That’s what these ten tips are about, supporting a healthier structure in your life, allowing you to control the cascade of dopamine and ultimately remain in control. To achieve this, we are going to look at three different elements to your social media use: how much you use it (Part 1), what you look at on it (Part 2), and finally, how you process what you look at (Part 3).

Part 1: How much you use social media

With its origins in Shakespeare, “too much of a good thing” still has powerful meaning in modern life. Like alcohol, sex or a beloved sports team, your social media use is no different, existing on a spectrum of zero interest to pathological obsession. The goal is to find that sweet spot of usage where you reap the benefits yet mitigate the harm. Here are the first five tips to help you achieve this.

Tip 1: Buy an alarm clock
Lying in bed with your phone and scrolling through social media wipes out your sleep-inducing melatonin. Instead, turn your phone off, and to kill any impulse checks, put it out of sight.

Tip 2: Schedule your social media use
Applying boundaries and structure instead of an unchecked tsunami of random scrolling throughout the day will make you more productive, focussed and ultimately in control.

Tip 3: Make sure you are present with others
“Attention is the rarest and purest form of generosity,” said philosopher Simone Weil. You have a real life, so embrace it and the people you are with. Save a quick scroll for the loo.

Tip 4: Develop a focussed approach
Understanding why you use social media reinforces your overall control. If it’s for work, then develop a marketing strategy. If it’s just chatting shit and arguing online, then good luck.

Tip 5: Ensure your art imitates your life
Develop a social media platform that truly reflects who you are in real life. Say what you would say in real life; comment how you would in real life – especially to the person’s face. Be real.

Part 2: What you look at on social media

Social media is awash with both great and terrible advice in equal measure. One of the key issues is that anyone can be an expert on it – whether they actually are is another question entirely. So, whether you are discovering health information opportunistically or deliberately seeking it, here are two tips to get reliable information.

Tip 6: Seek unpolished and genuine inspiration
While motivational content is dripping all over social media, choose the positive, realistic and unedited representations of health. The celeb Photoshopped to an inch of their life isn’t that.

Tip 7: Listen to the experts
Personal trainers, dieticians and healthcare professionals permeate social media. When you find them, just ask yourself if they are reliable, experienced voices for the topics they raise.

Part 3: How to process what you view

So now that you have viewed the health information on social media, you need to decide if it has simply provided a transient pleasure or whether it serves as an offline stepping stone to help you lead a healthier life. Here are three final tips to help make this a reality.

Tip 8: A stepping stone from online to offline
Reading about a health condition is a really good start: it helps you understand and contextualise it. Now use that as a trigger to see your GP and discuss the bothersome issue.

Tip 9: Triggering your personal cycle of change
This is about realising how you feel about a specific health issue, such as losing weight. Your social media view may nudge you into a new phase, giving momentum to your health journey.

Tip 10: Consolidation through your support network
Sharing and discussing your health interests and journey with online (or offline) groups of like-minded people is a cathartic and powerful way to consolidate your evolving health choices.

The takeaway

The impact of social media can rest anywhere between the devil and the deep blue sea. With the power of a swipe or a click, it can alter not only how you feel about your own health but also directly affect it. These ten tips are certainly not rocket science but rather intended as simple reminders to help make sure social media and your health continue to have a positive and amicable relationship. If not, divorce her.

Article source: http://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/article/ten-tips-to-rescue-your-health-from-social-media