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Healthy Living: Calm Your Nervous Pet – Northern Michigan’s News Leader

They don’t have to stress about work or traffic, but your four-legged friend is still prone to mental or emotional stress.

Instead of asking your vet for medications, we’ll show you some natural ways to calm your pet that you might want to try first.

The biggest thing you can do to calm your pet is to remain calm yourself.

If you get nervous, your dog will pick up on it and get even more anxious.

During a thunderstorm or fireworks, it’s best to act like you don’t even hear them.

Article source: http://www.9and10news.com/story/35752253/healthy-living-calm-your-nervous-pet

Trinidad Express Newspapers: Letters | Exercise a boost to healthy …

Headlines in the newspapers in Trinidad and Tobago recently read “SICK TT”.

This was disheartening for me and my fianc to read as we are fitness enthusiasts and believe in the importance of living a healthy lifestyle by participating in regular exercise, eating the right foods and drinking lots of water.

We share a passion for helping people reach their fitness goals whether it be to burn fat, build muscles or just simply to look and feel better in the clothes that they wear.

We go to the gym three times a week and while there we combine cardio routines with resistance exercise in the form of weight training.

Participating in regular exercise over time has many positive physical, mental, and social health enhancing properties. The quality and vigour of your life vastly improve.

You have heard this several times but it needs to be repeated that frequent exercise reduces your risk of contracting many diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and depression.

It improves your mood and also results in improved longevity and maintenance of independence into older age.

In everything we do there are advantages and disadvantages. Exercise can have a negative effect on health in the form of injury.

The effects that sport and exercise-related injuries have on an individual’s health can be relatively minor, with only a period of rest needed.

Sport and exercise-related injuries do not just effect elite performers, but are a significant problem at every level of participation.

Around a third of all emergency consultations are directly linked to sport and exercise. Although participation in any form of activity carries a risk of injury the overall health benefits of activity far outweighs this risk.

A lot of children at the ages of 14 and 15 years are entering the hospitals with diabetes and high blood pressure.

It is time to reverse the current high rate of one in four children being overweight or obese by promoting healthy nutrition which encourages children as well as adults on making healthy food choices, using correct portion sizes, and eating fruit and vegetables on a regular basis.

I want to appeal to the public to live active lifestyles through the use of gym facilities and other fun and innovative physical activities.

This will produce and improve self-confidence and self-esteem in the children and young adults.

It should be noted happy youths with high self-esteem report less involvement with crime, and programmes that increase happiness and self-confidence could deter crime and drug use.

As you begin your workout, your brain’s neurotransmitters connect memory with muscle to get you moving. The feelings of satisfaction and accomplishment you experience during your workout stimulate the pleasure centre of your brain and lift your mood.

Consistent workouts at the gym will eventually help you achieve your fitness goals.

When you look in the mirror and see a leaner or fitter-looking body staring back at you, you are more than likely to gain improvements in self-esteem and self-confidence.

Time spent exercising with other people in a spin or aerobics class provides you with a social environment where you can reap the emotional benefits gained through the camaraderie you develop with other gym members.

It is important to remember that when it comes to physical activity, anything is better than nothing!

Start with whatever seems manageable. Even a ten-minute walk on the treadmill at the gym can be beneficial to your health. You will likely be able to increase the amount and frequency of physical activity slowly as you start to feel better.

Generally, doctors recommend about 20-30 minutes of exercise three to five times per week, but it can be a good idea to talk with your own healthcare provider to decide what’s the best plan that will work for you and suit your lifestyle.

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Article source: http://www.trinidadexpress.com/20170626/letters/exercise-a-boost-to-healthy-living

Planting the seeds of healthy living

Farmworkers at Reiter Affiliated Companies are living healthier lives nowadays thanks to a health initiative called “Sembrando Salud,” or Healthy Planting.

The program was started by Garland S. Reiter, the company’s chief executive officer, in 2009. It is believed to be the first farmworker health program in the United States and was the impetus for other large agriculture companies to start similar services.

The program began with a health clinic for farmworkers at the company. Reiter Affiliated Companies is headquartered in Oxnard and grows strawberries, blackberries, raspberries and blueberries.

After finding that some farmworkers had chronic health issues, such as obesity and diabetes, Reiter partnered with UC Davis to develop a pilot health education curriculum.

The curriculum’s 10 health topics focused on farmworkers’ occupational and overall health. Sessions were offered in the evening. It was named “Pasos Saludables,” or Healthy Steps.

Three years later a study was done on the program, and it was decided that it would be better to take the program directly to the farmworkers.

The program, which is voluntary, trains field crew bosses and others interested in the voluntary program. They, in turn, train the field workers. Between 400 and 500 people graduate from the program annually. Since it began between 5,000 and 6,000 people have been trained.

Training is offered in Salinas, Santa Maria, Watsonville, Oxnard and in Mexico.

It consists of 10 20-minute sessions held once a week, said Gabby Guzman, program coordinator, who works at Reiter’s Salinas office, situated off Rossi Street.

“We talk about all the topics: diabetes, obesity, blood pressure, cholesterol and how to read nutrition labels,” Guzman said.

Training begins with a saying, such as, “A chip off the old block.” When related to healthy living that can be translated as, “If parents are eating unhealthy, so will the kids.”

The sessions finish up by promoting five health steps to healthy living: move, drink water, eat fruits and vegetables, measure food portions and your waist and share the information with family members.

Trainees then take the information they have learned to the field, where they practice their skills. For instance, they may challenge a crew to see if they can go a week without drinking sugary sodas. Also, crews began the day with warm-up exercises and do them again after their lunch break.

Reiter employees who run the program return a year later and review the five healthy steps with workers who were trained. Different sessions are offered as well.

“We’re still kind of in the development stage,” Guzman said of the program. “But we want the kind of program that will be lasting.”

Jose Rocha, a crew leader with Reiter in Watsonville who was trained as a health program leader, said, “It helps a lot because what we’ve learned during the leadership training. It helps a lot for our work and in our personal life. It motivates us and it makes us feel like the company is thinking about us. It’s a reminder to take care of our health.”

Another element of the program is monitoring farmworkers’ health, said Priscila Cisneros, program manager. Before the training sessions start 30 percent of a field crew are screened to establish a health study marker.

The company does blood work, testing glucose and hemoglobin. Blood pressure and cholesterol levels are checked and workers’ height and weight are measured.

“It’s another way of looking at the impact of the program,” Cisneros said.

“Being one of the (farmworker health) leaders has been a major accomplishment for Reiter,” she said.

Guzman, who has a degree from CSU, Monterey Bay, in collaborative health and health and human services, said working in the Sembrando Salud program is her dream job.

“It’s very fulfilling to apply everything I learned in my degree and giving back to the community,” she said.

She is one of a team of 10 that administer the program.

Reiter has expanded the program to family members of farmworkers. Free Zumba classes are available and there is an annual 5K run for workers and their families.

“The overall goal is to have fun and get you physically active,” Cisneros said. “The kids love it.”

Article source: http://www.thecalifornian.com/story/news/2017/06/27/planting-seeds-healthy-living/430951001/

Scleroderma: Living with autoimmune disease with no known cause, cure

Not much is known about scleroderma. There isn’t a known cause, or a cure, for the autoimmune disease.

Kim Curry of Uniontown does know, though, that it has changed her life in the last 15 years.

“It makes day-to-day living very hard,” Curry, 56, said.

Scleroderma is characterized by the hardening and tightening of skin and comes in three forms — limited, morphia and diffused.

Curry was diagnosed with the diffused form in 2002, which means it can manifest itself anywhere in your body.

“It affects my skin, blood vessels, internal organs, everything like that,” Curry said, noting that her gastrointestinal tract seems more impacted by it. She’s had 10 endoscopies and more than six colonoscopies over the last decade to monitor the progression of the disease.

According to the John Hopkins Scleroderma Center’s website, when a person is diagnosed with scleroderma, “cells start making collagen as if there were an injury that needs repairing.”

“The cells do not turn off as they should and end up making too much collagen. The extra collagen in the tissues can prevent the body’s organs from functioning normally,” the website states.

They also indicated that the severity of the disease varies.

“It can be a mild annoyance, or it can cause significant clinical problems,” it states. “For others, it can become life threatening.”

Day to day

The hardest part of Curry’s day is the morning.

After a long, restless night of sleep, Curry wakes with swollen, painful hands.

She’s prone to falling because of new balance issues and can suffer painful flare ups at any time.

It was the flare ups that eventually led to Curry being unable to work — the chronic joint and muscle pain incapacitating her. Chores around the house, even doing laundry, became difficult.

“When I feel good, I attribute it to lots of rest,” she said. “When I have a good day and don’t think I’m in pain, I try to get everything done. But then I pay for it for the next two or three days. I’ve learned to listen to my body and pace myself.”

With the diagnosis of scleroderma, several other diseases can manifest, including Raynaud’s disease — something with which Curry is very familiar.

“I’m intolerant to the cold,” she said. Her joints are a cause of pain; she can even tell when it’s going to rain or become humid by the amount of pain she’s in.

Though Curry’s favorite color is purple, she finds herself in some shade of teal every day in June, noting that it’s Scleroderma Awareness Month.

“We need research, and more awareness,” she said. “That’s the biggest thing.”

“This is much more rare than cancer, and there are a lot of people who don’t even know about it, let alone have the awareness to go research for it,” she added.

According to the Scleroderma Center, fewer than 500,000 people in the United States have been diagnosed.

“Some experts report that six out of seven patients are women,” the website states. “The most common age span for scleroderma to develop is between 35 and 50. Still, young children and older adults can get the disease.”

Article source: http://www.heraldstandard.com/healthy_living/scleroderma-living-with-autoimmune-disease-with-no-known-cause-cure/article_bf9ee863-875a-575c-ab48-6288a8553aef.html

Healthy living: How to choose the right sunscreen | | mtstandard.com

Do you often feel puzzled when faced with the countless sunscreen options available at your local drugstore? Here is some useful information to help you make a wise choice.

Anti-UVA and UVB

A good sunscreen provides protection on a broad spectrum. This means that it shields the skin against the harmful effects of both UVA and UVB rays, which can lead to signs of premature aging (wrinkles, dark spots, skin tags, etc.), painful sunburns and even skin cancer.

SPF 30 (or higher)

The sun protection factor (SPF) indicates the strength of protection against UVB rays. For example, an SPF of 15 blocks 93 per cent of UVB rays, while an SPF of 30 — the recommended minimum by the American Academy of Dermatology — blocks 97 per cent. If you apply a good layer of SPF 30 sunscreen, you can bask in the sun 30 times longer before burning than if you were to forgo sunscreen altogether. Here’s another helpful tip: your lips burn too! Make sure to protect them with a balm containing an SPF of at least 30.

Water-resistant

A sunscreen that isn’t waterproof becomes much less efficient as soon as it comes into contact with sweat or other sources of moisture. Thus, whether you actively play sports or not, it’s always best to choose a water-resistant brand for those sweltering summer days. But be careful! A sunscreen deemed water-resistant does not make it impervious to bodily fluids and other liquids. Always reapply sunscreen after a swim or profuse sweating for guaranteed protection.

Light-resistant

Many sunscreens lose their shielding power when exposed to the sun for prolonged periods of time. To get the best protection for your skin, opt for a photostable sunscreen that retains its integrity upon exposure to the light.

Once you’ve purchased your sunscreen, don’t be afraid to slather it on. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends the equivalent of two tablespoons for total coverage of a medium-sized adult. And don’t forget to reapply every two hours.

Infant care

 Did you know that it’s not recommended to apply sunscreen to infants under six months old? Instead, keep them in a well-shaded area, outfit them with a large-brimmed hat and invest in an UV-protective swimsuit with long sleeves for days spent by the pool.

Article source: http://mtstandard.com/healthy-living-how-to-choose-the-right-sunscreen/article_3632e89c-66f2-574d-8cbe-3f7001c1c883.html

Health briefs 6-26-17

Events

n Oncology Symposium, 8 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Featured topics include gastric cancer surgery, lung immunotherapy and multiple myeloma. Information and registration: 724-258-1750.

n Exercise classes, Tuesdays and Thursdays, Center in the Woods, 130 Woodland Court, Brownsville. Classes include chair dancing at 9:30 a.m. followed by healthy steps at 11 a.m. Information: 724-938-3554.

Support groups

n Stroke Support Group, 1-2:30 p.m., Thursday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information: 724-258-1455.

n Suicide Bereavement Group, 1-2:30 p.m., today, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information and registration: 724-268-1144.

n Al-Anon Family Groups, 8 p.m., Wednesdays, Trinity Church basement, Fayette and Morgantown streets, Uniontown, and 7:30 p.m., Fridays, Christian Church, Pittsburgh Street, Connellsville. These meetings are for anyone who has been affected by or is having problems from someone else’s drinking. Information: al-anon.alateen.org or pa-al-anon.org.

n Survivors of Incest Anonymous group, 6:30-8 p.m., the first and third Mondays of the month, excluding holidays. This 12-step recovery program is meant for men and women aged 18 or older who were sexually abused by a trusted person as a child. The group meets at the Mount Macrina Retreat Center. A similar group, Healing Friends, is from 6:30-7:30 p.m., East Liberty Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh, on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Information: peopleofcourage@gmail.com siawso.org, or healingfriends8@gmail.com.

n Missing Piece of My Heart Support Group, the last Thursday of each month, 6-8 p.m., at the Crime Victim’s Center conference room in the Oliver Square Plaza. The group is for families who have lost a child to a violent crime. Information: 724-438-1470.

n Silver Generation Support Program, 10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays, East End United Community Center, Uniontown. The program is for ages 55 and older. Information: 724-437-1660.

Courses

n The Safe Sitter Program, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday, in Community Room 1 of the main lobby at Uniontown Hospital. Information and registration: 724-430-6925.

n Is Weight Loss Surgery Right For Your? Seminar, 6 p.m., Thursday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information and registration: 724-258-1333.

n Learn to Prevent Type 2 diabetes, today, in the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information: 724-258-1483.

Article source: http://www.heraldstandard.com/healthy_living/health-briefs/article_7678b85a-e7f5-5785-a5ff-6cc546fa3684.html

Grand Islanders familiarized with Jensen, hike and bike trail, healthy living

Ben Newton, environmental sustainability director with Central Community College, with his daughter Neve (left), hands out brochures at one of the information stations during Walk with the Mayor at Eagle Scout Park on Saturday. (Independent/Andrew Carpenean)

Article source: http://www.theindependent.com/news/local/grand-islanders-familiarized-with-jensen-hike-and-bike-trail-healthy/article_b1322f82-5928-11e7-8804-67dcefbfdc99.html

CEO Bahram Akradi says Life Time is ‘just scratching the surface’ of healthy living

In the 25 years since Bahram Akradi founded Life Time, the company has come to embody the maxim that bigger is better. He’s bulked up its fleet of fitness centers to 127 across 27 states and Canada, with 14 more opening next year and another 100 expected in the next decade. Now privately held, Life Time projects revenue of about $1.6 billion in 2017 with 30,000 employees. But Akradi is looking far beyond fitness centers and recently dropped “fitness” from the company name. He’s exploring healthy lifestyle villages where people shop, live, work, exercise, visit their doctor and relax at the spa. The strategy is playing out in the company’s hometown of Chanhassen, where it is investing in a mixed-use development, and at Southdale Center in Edina, where Life Time will build a showpiece fitness center.

Q: Why was “Fitness” dropped from the Life Time name?

A: We always focused on building a company that’s a healthy way of life for the family and the planet. The company is so much more than fitness. Life Time is more broadly descriptive of medical, sports and athletic country club. We won’t drop it completely. Smaller facilities will still be called Life Time Fitness. 

Q: Can your integrated concept make money?

A: I don’t have to worry if we can make money on it. Not yet. We’re thinking of customer satisfaction only. 

Q: You’ve long been an admirer of the Disney brand, which is strong and distinct. Does Life Time have a distinct brand?

A: A lot of programs we have are ones we’ve developed — LT Proactive Care clinic, Alpha training. LT Physical Therapy, and Life Power yoga are uniquely branded. They are exclusive. It’s difficult to have excellence across all these various venues. Disney does a phenomenal job as a brand. We emulate that by having each division have its own president and goal to be the best in what we deliver. 

Q: What made you consider shopping malls as a location?

A: A couple of years back, we had no desire to go into a mall. But the idea is that we can re-imagine them as a healthy living and aging village with residences, entertainment, exercise, services and shops. Malls like Southdale are reapplying themselves to mixed-use. You can walk to shops, go to the health club, movie theater, and get groceries. Malls that are well-located will be a great story, not a sob story. 

Q: Does being in a mall cost you more or less as opposed to a stand-alone?

A: It’s complicated. It’s very different in different parts of the country. It’s not anything like the days when Sears or Penney’s would get almost free rents, but it works better than a free-standing building. 

Q: Only 3 percent of Americans can be called “fit,” according to a Mayo Clinic 2016 study. Does that motivate you or make you feel as if Life Time is close to saturation?

A: We’re just scratching the surface of building a whole healthy way of life with medicine, exercise and emotional-mental-physical health. The magic is in delivering all of them at a high level. Integrated medicine, that’s the key. We’re offering detailed, integrated instruction about how to exercise and eat. It’s not being done elsewhere. 

Q: Is the number of people using health clubs still rising?

A: Heathy living, aging and nutrition has been a megatrend for 40 to 50 years and it’s still growing. How you get fit is changing. The way people exercise is fragmenting faster than it’s growing. We work hard to adapt to the current need, and that won’t change, to remain relevant.

Q: Do you ever think about going smaller, as many big-box retailers have?

A: Restoration Hardware is going bigger and more experiential. The problem with large retailers is that they grow, they do great business, and then they go public. That’s an endless appetite for growth, forcing the growth and growing more than they should. Companies large and small need adaptation to keep up with change. The problem is not large vs. small. It’s those that haven’t changed. 

Q: Twelve years ago, you said you didn’t have a direct competitor. Is that still true today?

A: It’s more true now than 12 years ago. With our expansion and brand extension into all aspects of healthy ways of life, we need 300 team members in a large box to have everything work properly. It takes years of recruiting just to open one location. It’s so challenging that it would be very difficult to duplicate anywhere. 

Q: What is your personal workout schedule and has it changed in your 50s compared to your 40s?

A: Unfortunately, it takes more work to stay leaner. I spend about four to six hours a week exercising in winter, but in the spring and summer, it’s 14 to 15 hours a week. I want to be the healthiest I can be on a raw basis, not based on my age. I am 56, but I want to compare myself to a 26-year-old. I don’t want to lower the standards.

Article source: http://www.startribune.com/sunday-conversation-with-bahram-akradi-of-life-time/430481613/

Healthy living: How to choose the right sunscreen

Do you often feel puzzled when faced with the countless sunscreen options available at your local drugstore? Here is some useful information to help you make a wise choice.

Anti-UVA and UVB

A good sunscreen provides protection on a broad spectrum. This means that it shields the skin against the harmful effects of both UVA and UVB rays, which can lead to signs of premature aging (wrinkles, dark spots, skin tags, etc.), painful sunburns and even skin cancer.

SPF 30 (or higher)

The sun protection factor (SPF) indicates the strength of protection against UVB rays. For example, an SPF of 15 blocks 93 per cent of UVB rays, while an SPF of 30 — the recommended minimum by the American Academy of Dermatology — blocks 97 per cent. If you apply a good layer of SPF 30 sunscreen, you can bask in the sun 30 times longer before burning than if you were to forgo sunscreen altogether. Here’s another helpful tip: your lips burn too! Make sure to protect them with a balm containing an SPF of at least 30.

Water-resistant

A sunscreen that isn’t waterproof becomes much less efficient as soon as it comes into contact with sweat or other sources of moisture. Thus, whether you actively play sports or not, it’s always best to choose a water-resistant brand for those sweltering summer days. But be careful! A sunscreen deemed water-resistant does not make it impervious to bodily fluids and other liquids. Always reapply sunscreen after a swim or profuse sweating for guaranteed protection.

Light-resistant

Many sunscreens lose their shielding power when exposed to the sun for prolonged periods of time. To get the best protection for your skin, opt for a photostable sunscreen that retains its integrity upon exposure to the light.

Once you’ve purchased your sunscreen, don’t be afraid to slather it on. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends the equivalent of two tablespoons for total coverage of a medium-sized adult. And don’t forget to reapply every two hours.

Infant care

 Did you know that it’s not recommended to apply sunscreen to infants under six months old? Instead, keep them in a well-shaded area, outfit them with a large-brimmed hat and invest in an UV-protective swimsuit with long sleeves for days spent by the pool.

Article source: http://mtstandard.com/healthy-living-how-to-choose-the-right-sunscreen/article_3632e89c-66f2-574d-8cbe-3f7001c1c883.html

The Food that May Halt Brain Disease and Cancer

The exotic names of olives—Moroccan, Kalamata, nicoise, picholine and Manzanilla—sound almost as good as these varieties of olives taste. But taste is only one of the reasons to enjoy them. Olives and olive oil have long been considered part of a heart-healthy or weight loss diet, but a new research shows that these foods may help protect the brain against brain diseases.

Olives are an excellent source of healthy monounsaturated fats and vitamin E. Monounsaturated fats have a beneficial role to play in maintaining the outer membranes of brain cells, protecting your body’s genetic material and the energy-producing cellular components (mitochondria) that help fuel your brain.

Vitamin E offers antioxidant protection to the fatty components of your brain and can lower your risk of damage and inflammation. This vitamin is also your body’s primary fat-soluble antioxidant, meaning that it neutralizes damaging free radicals in all the fat-rich areas of your body, including your brain and the protective coating of your nerves. Your brain is more than 60 percent fat, making vitamin E a significant contributor to brain health. Like other types of monounsaturated fats, vitamin E also helps protect the energy production centers in your cells to ensure that your cells are capable of creating adequate energy for your many bodily processes and brain functions.

Olives and olive oil also help prevent the oxidation of cholesterol. Oxidized cholesterol has been linked to stroke. These anti-inflammatory actions of monounsaturated fats , vitamin E and beneficial plant chemicals called polyphenols help lessen the likelihood of inflammation in your brain. Olive oil is also rich in Omega-9 fatty acids that are important for your brain.

And, a recent study published in the Journal of Molecular Biology even suggests that oleic acid found in olives and olive oil may help to prevent or halt brain cancer. The study was preliminary so more research needs to be done before we can definitively say that olives and olive oil can help with brain cancer.

Be sure to use only organic olives or organic, cold-pressed, extra-virgin olive oil since it retains more beneficial nutrients and lacks potentially brain-damaging pesticides. When cooking with any type of oil, including olive oil, it is important to be sure that the oil never smokes. If it does, it has reached the oil’s “smoke point,” which is different for every type of oil. The smoke point is the point at which the oil will smoke and have a damaging effect on your body. Olive oil has a smoke point around 324 degrees Fahrenheit. Most types of vegetable oils available in grocery stores are heated to over 500 degrees Fahrenheit during processing, which is well beyond the smoke point even before they get to your kitchen. That means they should be completely avoided. Extra-virgin olive oil is the rare exception that tends to be processed at lower temperatures and is therefore fine for cooking at low temperatures.

Remember this when you’re cooking with any type of oil: if it smokes while you are heating it, it is essential that you throw it out and start over. Otherwise, the benefits of the oil are destroyed by the heat and it becomes capable of damaging cells in your brain through free radicals and inflammatory processes. Also, be sure to choose olives that are free from sulfites, as many commercial brands contain these and other chemical preservatives.

Related:
Don’t Believe in Herbal Medicine? 10 Things to Change Your Mind
The 5 Best Herbs to Soothe Your Nerves
Should You Actually Starve a Fever?

 

Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM is the publisher of the free e-newsletter World’s Healthiest News, president of PureFood BC, and an international best-selling and 20-time published book author whose works include: Boost Your Brain Power in 60 Seconds: The 4-Week Plan for a Sharper Mind, Better Memory, and Healthier Brain.

 

Article source: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/the-food-that-may-halt-brain-disease-and-cancer.html