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Crescent City Healthy Living for October 18, 2017

JOINT REPLACEMENT: Christy Shea, of Magnolia Physical Therapy, will give a free presentation on rehabilitation after joint replacement from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 21, at Little Farms United Church of Christ, 135 Sauve Road, River Ridge. The presentation will be followed by screenings from a licensed physical therapist. 

DISCOUNTED MAMMOGRAMS: In recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, screening mammograms are being offered for $99 during October in the Women’s Imaging Breast Care Center in the West Jefferson Medical Plaza at West Jefferson Medical Center, 4521 Westbank Expressway, Marrero. Call the center at (504) 349-6300.

CO-DEPENDENTS ANONYMOUS: The Co-Dependents Anonymous 12-step group for people seeking help with relationships will meet from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday at Aurora United Methodist Church, 3300 Eton St., New Orleans. For information on the self-help organization, visit coda.org.

EXERCISE FOR PARKINSON’S PATIENTS: There will be a free panel discussion of exercise options for Parkinson’s patients when the Big Easy Fleur de Lis Parkinson’s Support Group meets from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Oct. 30, in the Esplanade I room of the first-floor conference center at East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie. The panelists will be Trevor Comeaux and Greg Roninger, of Rock Steady Boxing; Dr. Nathan Macaluso and Ben Roussel, of Movement Science Center; and Rich Baudry, of Baudry Therapy. For information on the support group, contact Sissy Roniger at (504) 237-2302 or sroniger1@cox.net, or visit www.BigEasyFleurDeLis.org.

HEALTHY AGING: The Louisiana chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association will present a program on healthy aging from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 9, at Little Farms United Church of Christ, 135 Sauve Road, River Ridge. Lifestyle habits include cognitive ability, physical health and exercise, diet and nutrition, and social engagement. 

HELP WITH PRESCRIPTION COSTS: The New Orleans Council on Aging offers prescription assistance through its Aging and Disability Resource Center/Senior Rx helpline. The assistance is available to seniors, adults with disabilities and their families. Email mhorton@nocoa.org, or call (888) 922-8522 or (504) 827-7843. Have ready a Medicare number or insurance information, effective date for Medicare parts A or B, or Social Security number, along with a list of medicines. People with no insurance also can call.

WALKING GROUPS: Walking groups meet Saturday mornings at the New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, in City Park, and at St. Roch Park, 1800 St. Roch Ave. The City Park group, the AARP Soul Steppers, gathers at 9 a.m. The St. Roch group gathers at 9:30 a.m.

Article source: http://www.theadvocate.com/new_orleans/news/communities/crescent_city/article_2d10d692-aabb-11e7-bdd0-af7dea430a00.html

St. Tammany Healthy Living for Oct. 18, 2017

SLIDELL AUTISM SUPPORT GROUP: Strengthening Outcomes with Autism Resources will meet at 9  a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18, in the Community Outreach Center on the second floor of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. For information, call Anne Galiano at (504) 812-9548.

CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: People living with cancer and their caregivers will meet at 2:30  p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18, in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd. Remote participation is possible by calling (985) 280-8958 at 1 p.m. on group day.

WOMEN WARRIORS: Breast cancer patients, survivors and caregivers will meet at 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18, in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd. (985) 280-6611.

CAREGIVER SUPPORT: The Council on Aging for St. Tammany Parish caregiver support program lets those caring for people with Alzheimer’s, dementia or other age-related illnesses share their struggles and successes, guided by an experienced facilitator.

  • Sessions at the Slidell Senior Center, 610 Cousin St., are regularly held from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of each month; the next session will be a Wednesday, on Oct. 18.
  • Sessions at the Covington Senior Center, 500 Theard St., are from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month; the next session will be Oct. 24.

For information, call (504) 339-1757.

LAMAZE IN SLIDELL: A five-week series of Lamaze childbirth preparation classes will begin with a session from 6:30  p.m. to 8:30  p.m. Thursday, Oct. 19, in the community outreach center on the second floor of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. The classes are free for couples registered at Slidell Memorial Hospital and $90 for others. To register, call (985) 280-2657 or visit slidellmemorial.org.

LAMAZE CHILDBIRTH CLASS: Relaxation and breathing techniques for natural childbirth, signs and symptoms of labor, and postpartum care will be discussed during a Lamaze childbirth class to be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 19,  in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Bring a pillow and blanket. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit www.lakeviewregional.com.

PROSTATE AND BREAST CANCER: Dr. Carrie Marquette will discuss the risk factors, prevention and early detection of prostate and breast cancer at 11:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 20, during a free Lunch Learn program in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd., Slidell. To register, call (985) 280-2657 or visit slidellmemorial.org.

BIG BROTHER, BIG SISTER IN SLIDELL: A free Big Brother, Big Sister class for children ages 3-10 will be held from 10  a.m. to 11 a.m. Oct. 21 in the Florida Avenue conference room at Slidell Memorial Hospital, 1025 Florida Ave. Children will learn safe ways to interact and care for their family’s new baby, practice diapering and make a special gift for the new baby. To register, call (985) 280-2657 or visit slidellmemorial.org.

YOGA FOR CANCER PATIENTS: 5:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 23, in the Community Outreach Center, second floor, Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. Classes are free, but registration and medical release are required. (985) 707-4961.

MALL WALKERS: North Shore Square Mall, 150 Northshore Blvd., Slidell, will open for walkers at 7 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 25, through a partnership with Slidell Memorial Hospital, to encourage people to walk with the advantages of the mall’s security, air conditioning and water fountains. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

TODDLING TIME: Parents and their children, 16 months to 2½ years, will play and learn together through music and movement, arts and crafts, and story time from 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Oct. 25 at the St. Tammany Parish Hospital Parenting Center, 1505 N. Florida St., Suite B, Covington. The cost for nonmembers is $16 per month, per child. For information or to register, call (985) 898-4435 or ksupan@stph.org.

NUTRITION: Rebecca Lee will discuss approaches to achieving a healthy weight from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 26, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292.1234.

CUDDLE BUDDIES: Parents of babies will have opportunities for learning and support, while their babies have a social playtime, from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Oct. 26 at the St. Tammany Parish Hospital Parenting Center, 1505 N. Florida St., Suite B, Covington. The cost is $6 for members and $9 for others. For information, please email ksupan@stph.org or call (985) 898-4435.

WOMEN’S HEALTH ALLIANCE SEMINAR: The Slidell Memorial Hospital Women’s Health Alliance fall seminar will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 27, at the Northshore Harbor Center, 100 Harbor Center Blvd., Slidell. There will be health screenings from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., followed by lunch and a fashion show. Tickets are $40 at eventbrite.com

CHILD SAFETY SEAT INSPECTIONS: The St. Tammany Parenting Center is scheduling appointments for free inspections of child safety seats; call (985) 898-4435. Inspections are also held from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. every Tuesday at the Louisiana State Police Troop L headquarters, 2600 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville. Walk-ins are accepted, but appointments are appreciated. For information on the State Police program, call (985) 893-6250 or email greg.marchand@la.gov.

TAI CHI AND MEDITATION: The St. Tammany Cancer Center offers free Tai Chi classes from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. and free meditation classes from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. every Thursday at the Paul D. Cordes Outpatient Pavilion, 16300 La. 1085, Covington. Erlinda R. Nye leads the classes. 

NEW BABY SUPPORT GROUP: The St. Tammany Parish Hospital Parenting Center new baby support group meets from 11:15 a.m. to noon every Thursday (except holidays) at 1505 N. Florida St., Suite B, Covington. Join other mothers and their little ones (birth to 7 months old) to discuss child-development and parenting tips with other parents, as well as professionals. Free. To register or for information, email ksupan@stph.org or call (985) 898-4435.

AUTISM RESOURCES: Strengthening Outcomes with Autism Resources holds network support meetings for parents to share concerns and ideas relevant to living with autism from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the last Tuesday of each month at 4465 E. U.S. 190 Service Road, Covington. The next meeting will be Oct. 31. For information, visit www.soarwithautism.org, email comara@soarwithautism.org or call (985) 370-2300.

PLAY AND LEARN: Parents and their children, ages 2½ to 4 years, will play and learn together through music and movements, arts and crafts, and story time from 9:30 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Oct. 31 at the St. Tammany Parish Hospital Parenting Center, 1505 N. Florida St., Suite B, Covington. The cost per child is $15 for members and $24 for others. For information, email ksupan@stph.org or call (985) 898-4435.

 ALERTNESS TRAINING: St. Tammany Outreach for the Prevention of Suicide will present the safeTALK suicide alertness training program from 9 a.m. to noon Nov. 1 at 65278 Louisiana 434 in Lacombe. Anyone 15 or older can participate in the program, which teaches how to recognize when people have thoughts of suicide and how to connect them to suicide intervention resources. The program focuses on four TALK steps: tell, ask, listen and keep safe. This training has been approved for 2.5 general CEUs by the Louisiana Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers. The cost is $35. To register, visit www.stops-la.com. The executive director of STOPS is Lynette Savoie, (985) 237-5506.

SISTER SURVIVORS: The Sister Survivors support group for female cancer survivors meets from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at the St. Tammany Cancer Center, 1203 S. Tyler St., Covington. The next meeting will be Nov. 7. For information, call (985) 276-6832.

COVINGTON GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: A general grief support group for those adults who have suffered loss meets from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. on the first Wednesday of every month in the Madisonville Conference Room at St. Tammany Parish Hospital, 1203 S. Tyler St., Covington. The next meeting will be Nov. 8.  For information, contact Daniel Vanek, chaplain, at (985) 898-4562 or dvanek@stph.org.

BETTER BREATHERS CLUB: The Better Breathers Club, a program of the American Lung Association, meets from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, a campus of Tulane Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The next meeting will be Nov. 9.  The club is meant for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema; pulmonary fibrosis; and lung cancer, as well as and their caregivers. To register, visit lakeviewregional.com/calendar or call (985) 867-4390.

FOOT CARE: Dr. Ryan Green will give a presentation, “The Right Fit for Your Feet,” from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 14, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292-1234.

BABY AND ME TOBACCO-FREE: Slidell Memorial Hospital is holding smoking-cessation programs for expectant mothers on Mondays and Wednesdays by appointment. For information or to request an application, call Ashlee Menke at (504) 733-5539. 

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Gamblers Anonymous meets several times a week throughout the New Orleans area. Gamblers Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with one another that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from a gambling problem. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop gambling. For information, call (855) 222-5542 or visit gamblersanonymous.org.

Article source: http://www.theadvocate.com/new_orleans/news/communities/st_tammany/article_8b14167c-aab2-11e7-b57d-7b9df8ebae48.html

Healthy Living: October 17, 2017

Health Advisor Dr. Mark Allen stopped by the TV5 studios to tell us more about it.

The series is called: Acadia Hospital CARES (Child-Adolescent Resource and Educational Series).

Over the coming year Acadia will be highlighting crucial youth mental health and wellness issues, starting with youth suicide.

Future videos will follow young people as they address topics such as eating disorders, bullying, anxiety, sexual identity, substance abuse, and resiliency.

The goal of the videos is to provide adults with important, expert information that can be used to keep children and teens safe. We are fortunate to have a number of experts who will be featured in the videos, and they will be providing timely information, along with helpful resources.

Together, we can help to create opportunities for learning and growth, and work as a community to help young people navigate the sometimes treacherous waters of adolescence.

For additional resources go to:

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

If you are concerned about yourself or about somebody else, please contact:

Maine Crisis Hotline
1-888-568-1112

Crisis Text Line:
741741

Article source: http://www.wabi.tv/content/news/Healthy-Living-October-17-2017-451316093.html

Students urged to observe healthy living habits

By Jerry
Azanduna, GNA

Bawku (UE) Oct. 17, GNA – Mr Richard Avadetsi,
the Deputy Director of Nursing Services of the Psychiatry unit of the Bawku
Presbyterian Hospital, on Tuesday urged Senior High School Students to observe
healthy living habits so as to avoid mental illnesses.

He asked the students to eschew smoking Indian
herb, ‘Wee’, abuse of drugs such as Tramadol, Ataryar and excessive alcohol
consumption among others as those were the things  that could easily jeopardize one’s mental health.

Mr Avadetsi made the call during an outreach
programme to some educational institutions in Bawku, Upper East Region, to
create Awareness of the health condition and to mark the National Mental Health
day on the theme: Depression and Suicide: Let’s talk about mental health.

He said observing good personal hygiene, good
eating habits, exercise and good personal relations with people in society
among other things would foster perfect body efficiency to prevent any form of
mental illness. 

Addressing the students of Bawku Technical
Institute, Bawku Senior High School and the Bawku Senior High Technical School
and some basic educational institutions in the area, Mr Avadetsi pointed out
that good mental health had more relevance in academic work because with a stable
mind one could absorb the lessons taught in class and would perform better in
the academic field.

He mentioned that the negative effects of
substance abuse were enormous on the individual as it could cause instability
and inconsistencies in one’s behaviour.

He said schizophrenia, anxiety, seizures,
dementia, and delirium, bipolar affective, Parkinson’s, anorexia, bulimia,
autism and depression among others were forms of mental illnesses and that much
attention must be given to people who suffer from such disorders.

He urged the students to adopt the habit of
going in for routine mental checkups and report any form of mental illnesses to
the nearest psychiatrist for attention.

Mr Avadetsi called on the students to focus on
their studies and aim at excelling. Some of the students listening
to Mr Avadetsi.

GNA

Article source: http://www.ghananewsagency.org/health/students-urged-to-observe-healthy-living-habits-123684

College enshrines healthy living in bricks and mortar | Features …

BURLINGTON, Vt. — Pledges by college students to eschew drugs and alcohol are old hat. Now they’re meditating, working out, practicing yoga, eating healthfully, and at least one school, the University of Vermont, it has become a bona fide lifestyle.

In UVM’s Wellness Environment, known as WE, students live in a new, big substance-free dorm, take a required class in what affects the health of their brains and bodies, and are given incentives to stay healthy like access to a free gym membership, nutrition and fitness coaches and an app that tracks their activities.

“We created an environment where we believe if we offer young people healthy foods, healthy choices, they’ll make them. We reward those things, and we don’t encourage the negative things, so the rule in the environment is no alcohol, no drugs, and the students follow it,” said Dr. Jim Hudziak, the chief of child psychiatry at the UVM’s Larner College of Medicine, who founded the Wellness Environment or WE program.

It goes beyond the wellness and substance-free residential halls found at some colleges.

“It looks at them (students) as an individual, which is really important obviously for health and wellness, but then it’s also making changes to their community,” said David Arnold, of the Washington-based NASPA, Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education. “So combining those two things together as well as working broader with faculty is actually a very, very impressive implementation of that process.”

At the start of a recent class, “Healthy Brains, Healthy Bodies,” the auditorium full of students stood with eyes closed for a few minutes of meditation. Then Hudziak, who tosses a brain-shaped football to students in the auditorium before class, discussed neuroscience topics including how traumatic or stressful experiences in childhood can affect physical and mental health.

And there’s no tolerance for alcohol or drugs in the dorm. If you’re caught with either in the environment, you’re thrown out, Hudziak said.

“I’m a genetic neuroscientist and child psychiatrist who wanted to end what I thought and saw was very damaging cultures in university settings, and I thought using neuroscience and behavior change science rather than sort of lecturing and setting standards of behavior would work,” he said.

That makes for a quieter dorm, said freshman Cole Spaulding, of Waterbury, as he worked out in the dorm’s fitness center on a recent evening.

“You’re sitting at home in your dorm, and it’s not like people are yelling. You know the bathrooms are always clean. It’s a nice place to just live,” he said.

WE students pay the same rate for campus housing as other students.

After a recent evening meditation class in the dorm, Hannah Bryant, of Brewster, Massachusetts, said her choice to join WE already has paid off.

She bases her life around living a healthy lifestyle and liked the chance to be surrounded by healthy opportunities like yoga, meditation and good food.

“Just like already within the first three weeks of school has already made a huge difference. And it’s things like this, the 30 minutes, that can really change your week around,” she said.

Through the app, students earn coins for healthy choices that can be used to buy WE paraphernalia — socks, sweat shirts, hats. They’re also encouraged to mentor kids in the community as one of the four pillars on which the program is based: fitness, mindfulness, nutrition and relationships.

Freshman Joy Vincenzo of Portland, Connecticut, said she chose the WE program because in high school she would get stressed about school work.

The UVM program has helped in her first few weeks of college. She does yoga and, when she has breaks between classes, she might go to the gym for 20 minutes.

“This argument of WE is, if we teach and practice these health-promoting activities, when things get tough, you’ll rely on a whole new set of skills,” Hudziak said.

Article source: http://www.kokomotribune.com/news/features/college-enshrines-healthy-living-in-bricks-and-mortar/article_44705483-88e3-56b3-a82f-96bda83d999c.html

College enshrines healthy living in bricks and mortar – News – The …

BURLINGTON, Vt. — Pledges by college students to eschew drugs and alcohol are old hat. Now they’re meditating, working out, practicing yoga, eating healthfully, and at least one school, the University of Vermont, it has become a bona fide lifestyle.

In UVM’s Wellness Environment, known as WE, students live in a new, big substance-free dorm, take a required class in what affects the health of their brains and bodies, and are given incentives to stay healthy like access to a free gym membership, nutrition and fitness coaches and an app that tracks their activities.

“We created an environment where we believe if we offer young people healthy foods, healthy choices, they’ll make them. We reward those things, and we don’t encourage the negative things, so the rule in the environment is no alcohol, no drugs, and the students follow it,” said Dr. Jim Hudziak, the chief of child psychiatry at the UVM’s Larner College of Medicine, who founded the Wellness Environment or WE program.

It goes beyond the wellness and substance-free residential halls found at some colleges.

“It looks at them (students) as an individual, which is really important obviously for health and wellness, but then it’s also making changes to their community,” said David Arnold, of the Washington-based NASPA, Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education. “So combining those two things together as well as working broader with faculty is actually a very, very impressive implementation of that process.”

At the start of a recent class, “Healthy Brains, Healthy Bodies,” the auditorium full of students stood with eyes closed for a few minutes of meditation. Then Hudziak, who tosses a brain-shaped football to students in the auditorium before class, discussed neuroscience topics including how traumatic or stressful experiences in childhood can affect physical and mental health.

And there’s no tolerance for alcohol or drugs in the dorm. If you’re caught with either in the environment, you’re thrown out, Hudziak said.

“I’m a genetic neuroscientist and child psychiatrist who wanted to end what I thought and saw was very damaging cultures in university settings, and I thought using neuroscience and behavior change science rather than sort of lecturing and setting standards of behavior would work,” he said.

That makes for a quieter dorm, said freshman Cole Spaulding, of Waterbury, as he worked out in the dorm’s fitness center on a recent evening.

“You’re sitting at home in your dorm, and it’s not like people are yelling. You know the bathrooms are always clean. It’s a nice place to just live,” he said.

WE students pay the same rate for campus housing as other students.

After a recent evening meditation class in the dorm, Hannah Bryant, of Brewster, Mass., said her choice to join WE already has paid off.

She bases her life around living a healthy lifestyle and liked the chance to be surrounded by healthy opportunities like yoga, meditation and good food.

“Just like already within the first three weeks of school has already made a huge difference. And it’s things like this, the 30 minutes, that can really change your week around,” she said.

Through the app, students earn coins for healthy choices that can be used to buy WE paraphernalia — socks, sweat shirts, hats. They’re also encouraged to mentor kids in the community as one of the four pillars on which the program is based: fitness, mindfulness, nutrition and relationships.

Freshman Joy Vincenzo of Portland, Conn., said she chose the WE program because in high school she would get stressed about school work.

The UVM program has helped in her first few weeks of college. She does yoga and, when she has breaks between classes, she might go to the gym for 20 minutes.

“This argument of WE is, if we teach and practice these health-promoting activities, when things get tough, you’ll rely on a whole new set of skills,” Hudziak said.

Article source: http://www.theledger.com/news/20171016/college-enshrines-healthy-living-in-bricks-and-mortar

Cleveland leaders promote safety and healthy living with … – WKYC

Ride2Achieve Program

Article source: http://www.wkyc.com/news/cleveland-leaders-promote-safety-and-healthy-living-with-ride2achieve-program/483590069

Health briefs 10-16-17

Events

n Managing Your Diabetes, 6-9 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information and registration: 724-258-1483.

n Breast Cancer Luncheon, Education and Screening 12:30-3 p.m., Wednesday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information and registration: 724-258-1333.

n Weight Loss Surgery for a Healthier You Information Seminar, 4:30 p.m., Wednesday, in Community Room 2 of the main lobby in Uniontown Hospital. Information: 412-641-3744.

n American Red Cross blood drive, 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Oct. 26, in the lunch room on the first floor of the Excela Health Corporate Services Center in Hempfield. Registration is required. Information: 1-800-CROSS.

n Exercise classes, Tuesdays and Thursdays, Center in the Woods, 130 Woodland Court, Brownsville. Classes include chair dancing at 9:30 a.m. followed by healthy steps at 11 a.m. Information: 724-938-3554

Support groups

n Arthritis Support Group, 1 p.m., Wednesday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information: 724-258-1321.

n Ostomy Support Group, 2-3:30 p.m., Thursday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information: 724-258-1773.

n Stroke Support Group, 6-8 p.m., Oct. Thursday, in Community Room 1 of the main lobby in Uniontown Hospital. Information: 724-430-5212.

n Nar-Anon Family Group, 6-7 p.m., Oct. Friday, at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information: 412-512-4718.

n Suicide Bereavement Support Group, 1-2:30 p.m., Oct. 23, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information and registration: 724-268-1144.

n Grief Support Group, 2-3:30 p.m. at Blessed Sacrament Cathedral in Greensburg, and 6-7:30 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church in Latrobe, both beginning Sept. 7.

n Stepping Stones Bereavement Support Program, beginning 7 p.m., Mondays, at the Fayette County Health Center on New Salem Road. Anyone who is grieving the loss of a loved one is welcome. Information and registrations: 724-438-9373 or 724-439-1683.

n Grief support group, 6-8 p.m., first Tuesday of every month, at the St. John the Evangelist Church on West Crawford Avenue in Connellsville. The group is a collaborative effort for those facing grief due to the loss of a loved one from addiction. Information: 724-628-6840.

n Grief support group with art, 6-7 p.m., Wednesdays, Excela Health Latrobe Hospital. Information: 724-516-8605.

n Al-Anon Family Groups, 8 p.m., Wednesdays, Trinity Church basement, Fayette and Morgantown streets, Uniontown, and 7:30 p.m., Fridays, Christian Church, Pittsburgh Street, Connellsville. These meetings are for anyone who has been affected by or is having problems from someone else’s drinking. Information: al-anon.alateen.org or pa-al-anon.org.

n Survivors of Incest Anonymous group, 6:30-8 p.m., the first and third Mondays of the month, excluding holidays. This 12-step recovery program is meant for men and women aged 18 or older who were sexually abused by a trusted person as a child. The group meets at the Mount Macrina Retreat Center. A similar group, Healing Friends, is from 6:30-7:30 p.m., East Liberty Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh, on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Information: peopleofcourage@gmail.com siawso.org, or healingfriends8@gmail.com.

n Missing Piece of My Heart Support Group, the last Thursday of each month, 6-8 p.m., at the Crime Victim’s Center conference room in the Oliver Square Plaza. The group is for families who have lost a child to a violent crime. Information: 724-438-1470.

n Silver Generation Support Program, 10 a.m. to noon, Wednesdays, East End United Community Center, Uniontown. The program is for ages 55 and older. Information: 724-437-1660.

Courses

n Childbirth and Labor Preparation Courses, 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, in Community Room 1 of the main lobby in Uniontown Hospital. Registration is required. Information: 724-430-4646.

n Innovations in Spinal Stenosis, 6 p.m., today, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital.

n Yoga class, 5:15 p.m., Mondays, Conference Room D at the Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital, and Thursdays, Auditorium A/B/ in the Excela Health Latrobe Hospital.

n Chair Fit mixed cardiovascular training, 10:30-11:30 a.m., Mondays, Conference Room D in Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital.

n Interval Training class, 4:30-5:40 p.m., Mondays, at the Memorial Conference Center at Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital.

n Body Sculpting and Core Conditioning, 4:30 p.m., Wednesdays, in the Memorial Conference Center in Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital. Information: 724-830-8568.

Article source: http://www.heraldstandard.com/healthy_living/health-briefs/article_f10aee6e-cca6-5686-bac4-aed4717a3ccf.html

UVM enshrines healthy living in bricks and mortar | The Bennington …

BURLINGTON, Vt. — Pledges by college students to eschew drugs and alcohol are old hat. Now they’re meditating, working out, practicing yoga, eating healthfully, and at least one school, the University of Vermont, it has become a bona fide lifestyle.

In UVM’s Wellness Environment, known as WE, students live in a new, big substance-free dorm, take a required class in what affects the health of their brains and bodies, and are given incentives to stay healthy like access to a free gym membership, nutrition and fitness coaches and an app that tracks their activities.

“We created an environment where we believe if we offer young people healthy foods, healthy choices, they’ll make them. We reward those things, and we don’t encourage the negative things, so the rule in the environment is no alcohol, no drugs, and the students follow it,” said Dr. Jim Hudziak, the chief of child psychiatry at the UVM’s Larner College of Medicine, who founded the Wellness Environment or WE program.

It goes beyond the wellness and substance-free residential halls found at some colleges.

“It looks at them (students) as an individual, which is really important obviously for health and wellness, but then it’s also making changes to their community,” said David Arnold, of the Washington-based NASPA, Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education. “So combining those two things together as well as working broader with faculty is actually a very, very impressive implementation of that process.”

At the start of a recent class, “Healthy Brains, Healthy Bodies,” the auditorium full of students stood with eyes closed for a few minutes of meditation. Then Hudziak, who tosses a brain-shaped football to students in the auditorium before class, discussed neuroscience topics including how traumatic or stressful experiences in childhood can affect physical and mental health.

And there’s no tolerance for alcohol or drugs in the dorm. If you’re caught with either in the environment, you’re thrown out, Hudziak said.

“I’m a genetic neuroscientist and child psychiatrist who wanted to end what I thought and saw was very damaging cultures in university settings, and I thought using neuroscience and behavior change science rather than sort of lecturing and setting standards of behavior would work,” he said.

That makes for a quieter dorm, said freshman Cole Spaulding, of Waterbury, as he worked out in the dorm’s fitness center on a recent evening.

“You’re sitting at home in your dorm, and it’s not like people are yelling. You know the bathrooms are always clean. It’s a nice place to just live,” he said.

WE students pay the same rate for campus housing as other students.

After a recent evening meditation class in the dorm, Hannah Bryant, of Brewster, Massachusetts, said her choice to join WE already has paid off.

She bases her life around living a healthy lifestyle and liked the chance to be surrounded by healthy opportunities like yoga, meditation and good food.

“Just like already within the first three weeks of school has already made a huge difference. And it’s things like this, the 30 minutes, that can really change your week around,” she said.

Through the app, students earn coins for healthy choices that can be used to buy WE paraphernalia — socks, sweat shirts, hats. They’re also encouraged to mentor kids in the community as one of the four pillars on which the program is based: fitness, mindfulness, nutrition and relationships.

Freshman Joy Vincenzo of Portland, Connecticut, said she chose the WE program because in high school she would get stressed about school work.

The UVM program has helped in her first few weeks of college. She does yoga and, when she has breaks between classes, she might go to the gym for 20 minutes.

“This argument of WE is, if we teach and practice these health-promoting activities, when things get tough, you’ll rely on a whole new set of skills,” Hudziak said.

Article source: http://www.benningtonbanner.com/stories/uvm-enshrines-healthy-living-in-bricks-and-mortar,521860

Project Healthy Living Expos reach over 350 from LOTO area

Over 350 people took the time to learn about the many resources available for youth in the Lake area, and were then eligible to enter a drawing for a laptop

Project Healthy Living sponsored its 8th annual Parent-Teen Info/Expo at the Camdenton football game against Kickapoo on September 8 and at the Osage game against Eldon on October 6.

The expos presented the opportunity for those attending the games to gain valuable information at booths set up by community organizations that are dedicated to helping parents and youth.

Over 350 people took the time to learn about the many resources available for youth in the Lake area, and were then eligible to enter a drawing for a laptop.

Project Health Living is a volunteer nonprofit organization dedicated to the betterment of the Lake of the Ozarks communities. It meets the first Wednesday of each month at 9 a.m. at the main office of Central Bank in Osage Beach. New ideas are welcome.

For more information, please contact Gerry Williams at (573) 374-9147 or email at wms1026@hotmail.com

Article source: http://www.lakenewsonline.com/news/20171014/project-healthy-living-expos-reach-over-350-from-loto-area