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Healthy Living Goes Back To School

Healthy Living Goes Back To School





Terre Haute – This time of year kids are going back to school and bringing home germs.

“With kids being back in school germs are spreading so now is the time to go ahead and get yourself immunized,” said Erin Haggart, Pharmacist.

 

On Saturday Meijer held a Healthy Living Event where anyone can show up, with no appointment, and get back to school vaccines.

“We are targeting everybody. There has been a lot of children come and get vaccines the past few weeks getting ready for back to school, but year round we target everybody for vaccines,” said Haggart.

It is no coincidence that this event is held during back to school time.

If you wait until flu season to start your vaccinations you could be too late.

It is common for people to not start thinking about fighting things off like the flu until winter comes.

But if you are going to vaccinate it is important to start now because vaccines can take up to 2 weeks before they start fully doing their job.

The Healthy Living Campaign tries to help kids and families get ready for back to school germs and make it as easy as possible to keep kids healthy.

“I think that it really just helps make sure that you have a healthy community,” said Haggart.

 

With the Healthy Living campaign every flu shot donates $5 to a local food pantry.

But, any day you can go during Meijer pharmacy hours and get your flu shot, no appointment necessary.

 

A flu vaccine is not required for students.

But the CDC recommends a flu shot for everyone over the age of six months.

But there are a list of vaccines for every grade that are required.

You can find the full list of vaccine requirements in your schools handbook along with the deadline to when your child needs to comply.

Article source: http://www.mywabashvalley.com/news/healthy-living-goes-back-to-school/787890908

Healthy living workshops begin Aug. 21 at F Street Rec Center

Whenever Shelly Kulhanek | Lincoln Journal Star posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Article source: http://journalstar.com/news/local/healthy-living-workshops-begin-aug-at-f-street-rec-center/article_ad2d014b-b273-5838-83ab-747449b194d0.html

Healthy Living: Coronary artery disease is a hidden danger for kids …

CINCINNATI – It’s a condition you don’t normally associate with kids. But it’s the second leading cause of high school athletes collapsing on the field.

Coronary artery disease in kids can be a silent killer because it strikes without warning.

“These patients are at risk for sudden death and that’s their first symptom,” said Dr. Tom Kimball of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.

The possibility was “terrifying” to Natalie Mauch, a Tri-State teen who’s headed to Indiana University. But when Natalie was 13, she suddenly found out she needed open heart surgery.

“It was overwhelming,” Natalie remembers. “I was old enough to know what was going on, but still so young and it was so scary.”

Doctors following up on a heart murmur discovered she had coronary artery disease.

Her mother was stunned.

“To look at her when she was growing up, you would never think anything was wrong with her,” said Teresa Mauch. “She had no symptoms.”

Dr. Kimball drew a picture to explain the problem with Natalie’s heart.

“Her right coronary artery did not come off the proper location,” he said.

It came off the right side and coursed toward the left, running between two other major vessels. When those vessels pumped more blood during exercise – and Natalie played volleyball -  the artery was squeezed.

That could have led to cardiac arrest.

The family chose open heart surgery.

“If we chose not to do it, it was like a time bomb,” Natalie’s mother said.

Doctors moved the artery where it needed to be, and now Natalie’s prognosis is “excellent,” Kimball said.

Now Kimball and his colleagues at Cincinnati Children’s have started a clinic for coronary artery disease.

But if there are no symptoms, and if doctors typically find coronary artery disease in kids by chance, how can a clinic help?

The clinic allows doctors to standardize how they treat the problem and to develop a special expertise, which could improve care, Kimball said.

Article source: http://www.wcpo.com/news/health/healthy-living/healthy-living-coronary-artery-disease-is-a-hidden-danger-for-kids

Healthy Living: Achromatopsia Cure?

A once-barren, unused space in the Roscommon County Jail sprouted to life, bringing inmates out of their cells and into the garden.

Article source: http://www.9and10news.com/story/36117112/healthy-living-achromatopsia-cure

‘Healthy Living for Summer’: Having a balanced diet – ABC News

Dieting can be a frustrating experience, at times leading to feelings of guilt or tempting cravings. In the seventh episode of ABC News’ “Healthy Living for Summer” series, we spoke with Shawn Stevenson, a nutritionist, author and host of the podcast “The Model Health Show,” who shared advice on how to have a balanced diet without necessarily having to diet.

PHOTO: Dieting tips and advice from nutritionist Shawn Stevenson.Galia Sotomayor/ABC News
Dieting tips and advice from nutritionist Shawn Stevenson.

“The real cause of overeating, when it boils down to it, is that nutrient-deficiency leads to chronic overeating,” Stevenson said. “We need to be proactive with our nutrition, instead of reactive.”

Having a balanced lifestyle is preferable to sticking to a specific type of diet, Stevenson advises.

Below is more advice Stevenson gave ABC News. Watch the video above for more details.

Quick tips

  • Eat whole foods, or foods that are not as processed or refined
  • Have leafy green vegetables often
  • At the end of your day, make sure what you’re eating is not nutrient-deficient
  • Incorporate short and intense exercises into your routine to fight stress and cravings
  • Get plenty of sleep — try exercising in the morning and avoid too much technology (or blue light exposure) at night
  • Think positively and avoid looking at food in terms of limits — call it a “treat” meal, not a “cheat” meal
  • PHOTO: Dieting tips and advice from nutritionist Shawn Stevenson.Galia Sotomayor/ABC News
    Dieting tips and advice from nutritionist Shawn Stevenson.

    Watch ABC News discuss balanced eating in the video above.
    This weekly health series will continue throughout the summer.

    Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/healthy-living-summer-balanced-diet/story?id=49160131

    10 Farmer’s Markets You Should See Before You Die

    Summer is winding down, but as all foodies know, the sweet spot between summer and autumn is an absolute boon for farmers market-goers. Apples, pumpkin, sweet corn, beets, greens… The plethora of fresh options available from your local producers is about to grow exponentially. And while all farmers markets offer some great finds, there are a few iconic markets scattered across the US that are particularly known for their fantastic produce. Here are 10 farmers markets you shouldn’t miss.

    The Original Farmers Market, Los Angeles

    This market claims to be the “original” farmer’s market. While it’s hard to be 100 percent sure about that, I am certain that this destination is verifiably amazing. It’s been open since 1934 and is packed not only with local vendors selling produce and locally raised meats, but also restaurants, kiosks and shops.

    Pike Place Market, Seattle

    If you know anything about farmer’s markets, you’ve undoubtedly heard about Pike Place. It’s one of Seattle’s main attractions, and boasts vendors from all parts of the Pacific Northwest. Seafood and coffee are two obvious choices you simply cannot miss, but there’s plenty of offerings here to meet every taste.

    Copley Square Farmers Market, Boston 

    Located in one of Boston’s most beautiful historic districts, the Copley Square Farmer’s Market is an absolute joy. Not only will you enjoy fresh produce and other finds from local sellers, you’ll also enjoy the charms of historic Boston.

    Green City Market, Chicago

    Green City Market is a destination to rival much bigger farmer’s markets. Held in Chicago’s beautiful and sprawling Lincoln Park, it’s steps away from Lake Michigan and offers gorgeous, lush greenery to enjoy while you stroll through the stands, sipping on locally brewed kombucha and sampling boutique syrup and honey.

    Sweet Auburn Market, Atlanta

    Atlanta’s farmers market is mostly located indoors, which is great for guests, as Atlanta’s summertime temps can get pretty hot. The market has been operating since 1918 (even longer than Los Angeles’ farmer’s market!) and has withstood the test of time.

    Ferry Plaza Farmers Market, San Francisco

    Bay Area residents flock to the Ferry Plaza Farmer’s Market, and if you know anything about Bay Area residents, you’ll know that they are picky about their food! The offerings in SF’s farmer’s market are simply phenomenal, featuring a cornucopia of Northern California’s finest produce, meat, artisan snacks and other treats.

    Union Square Greenmarket, New York

    New Yorkers are used to having lots of options, and nowhere is the city’s diversity of choice more apparently than at the Union Street Greenmarket. Even New York’s most reputed chefs are spotted doing their shopping here.

    Dane County Farmer’s Market, Madison 

    Madison, Wisconsin, isn’t as big as many of the cities on this list, but it certainly has an equal amount of spirit. This college town is home to one of the best downtowns in the Midwest, and the farmers market is held in this iconic downtown throughout the summer month. Wander the square of Wisconsin’s capital and enjoy live music, vendors from all over the Midwest, local eats and plenty of activities for kids and adults alike.

    Davis Farmer’s Market, Davis

    Davis, California, is another college town with an amazing farmer’s market. In addition to its local offerings, the market offers a Picnic in the Park throughout the Spring, Summer and Fall during which market-goers can browse the stalls, grab a beer or wine and sit in the park while enjoying live music.

    Charleston Farmers Market, Charleston

    For a Southern take on the farmers market, head to gorgeous and historic Charleston. The city’s farmer’s market is simply iconic and features amazingly fresh food and drinks from all manner of local growers and producers. The stunning historic architecture doesn’t hurt, either.

    Related:
    How to Travel Frugally
    7 Top Green Travel Destinations
    Health Benefits of Travel for Seniors

    Article source: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/10-farmers-markets-you-should-see-before-you-die.html

    Healthy Living: Opioid crisis in America much worse than reported

    The latest government numbers show that drug overdose deaths in 2016 continued to climb despite ongoing efforts to stem the overdose epidemic. 

    The age-adjusted quarterly death rate for drug overdoses increased by more than 20 percent between the first quarter of 2015 and the third quarter of 2016.

    Most of those overdoses are from opioids and new data indicated the number of opioid-related deaths may be under-reported.

    Between 2000 and 2015, the number of overdose deaths in the United State rose more than 137 percent. More than half a million people died from drug overdoses during that time.

    According to the CDC, prescription opioids are a driving factor in the increase, with more than 60 percent of all drug overdose deaths in the U.S. involving opioids. 

    Across the country, 91 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.

    A new study found that many opioid-related overdoses are under-reported and the scope of the problem may be much worse.

    Researchers found that 20 to 25 percent of overdose death certificates did not have any specific drug listed as a cause, suggesting that estimates could be significantly off.

    They believe the death rate from opioids is 24 percent higher than previously estimated.

    The study’s lead author said data on drug overdose deaths should be improved so that authorities can better understand the opioid crisis and respond effectively.

    According to the San Diego County Medical Examiner’s annual report, heroin is the leading cause of drug or alcohol-related deaths among people ages 20 to 29.

    In 2015, there were 90 heroin overdose deaths in San Diego County.  

    Article source: http://www.kusi.com/story/36111846/healthy-living-opioid-crisis-in-america-much-worse-than-reported

    Lowell organization building shelter for homeless pregnant women

    Girls, including Isabelle Garduno, 3, right, dance during a Princess Brunch to benefit Mommy’s Haven in December at Crown Point Christian School in St. John.

    Article source: http://www.nwitimes.com/niche/get-healthy/healthy-living/lowell-organization-building-shelter-for-homeless-pregnant-women/article_a74d515a-ef59-5b5c-92b3-6a2c94e237f0.html

    St. Tammany Healthy Living for August 9, 2017 – The Advocate

    STROKE SUPPORT GROUP: A support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers will meet from 5:30  p.m. to 6:30  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 9, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Topics include nutrition, social services, rehabilitation therapy and medical management. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: Caregivers may benefit from a basic life support course to be held from 8:15  a.m. to 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 9, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The course is designed to teach CPR for victims of all ages and use of an automated external defibrillator. Cost is $35, plus a $20 deposit for the book. Call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    ME AND MY TOT TIME: Parents and grandparents will discuss child development issues and parenting tips while their children enjoy playtime with others Wednesday, Aug. 9, in the Community Outreach Center, second floor, Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. The 9:30 a.m. session is for toddlers up to 30 months, and the 11 a.m. session is for ages 31 months to preschool. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

    BABY AND ME: Parents of babies who are not yet walking will share issues and insights about parenting at 10  a.m. Thursday, Aug. 10, in the Community Outreach Center on the second floor of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

    LOOK GOOD … FEEL BETTER IN SLIDELL: Women with cancer can get free make-up kits, step-by-step demonstrations, a free lunch and support from this program, which will meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Aug. 14, at the Slidell Memorial Hospital Imaging Center, 1495 Gause Blvd., Slidell. To register, call (985) 280-2657.

    YOGA FOR CANCER PATIENTS: 5:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 14, Community Outreach Center, second floor, Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. Classes are free, but registration and medical release are required. (985) 280-6600.

    LAMAZE IN SLIDELL: A five-week series of Lamaze childbirth preparation classes will begin from 6:30  p.m. to 8:30  p.m. Aug. 15 in the community outreach center on the second floor of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. The classes are free for couples registered at Slidell Memorial Hospital and $90 for others. To register, call (985) 280-2657 or visit slidellmemorial.org.

    CAREGIVER SUPPORT: The Council on Aging for St. Tammany Parish caregiver support program lets those caring for people with Alzheimer’s, dementia or other age-related illnesses share their struggles and successes, guided by an experienced facilitator.

    • Sessions at the Slidell Senior Center, 610 Cousin St., are from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of each month; the next sessions will be Aug. 15 and Sept. 5.
    •  Sessions at the Covington Senior Center, 500 Theard St., are from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month; the next sessions will be Aug. 22 and Sept. 12. For information, call (504) 339-1757.

    TAI CHI: Master Bruce will lead a free tai chi program at noon Wednesday, Aug. 16, at the West St. Tammany YMCA, 71256 Francis Road, Covington. To register, call (800) 561-4127 or visit peopleshealth.com/wellness. by Aug. 14.

    SLIDELL AUTISM SUPPORT GROUP: Strengthening Outcomes with Autism Resources will meet at 9  a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 16, the Community Outreach Center on the second floor of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. For information, call Anne Galiano at (504) 812-9548.

    WOMEN WARRIORS: Breast cancer patients, survivors and caregivers will meet at 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 16, in the Community Outreach Center, second floor, Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. (985) 280-6611.

    GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: Certified grief counselor Sue deRada will lead the Open Arms grief support group at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 16, at Piccadilly Cafeteria, 104 U.S. 190, Slidell. The cost is $10. The next session will be Aug. 30. To register, call (985) 630-6363.

    CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: People living with cancer and their caregivers will meet at 2:30  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 16, in the community outreach center on the second floor of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. Remote participation is possible by calling (985) 280-8958 at 1  p.m. on group day.

    LAMAZE CHILDBIRTH CLASS: Relaxation and breathing techniques for natural childbirth, signs and symptoms of labor, and postpartum care will be discussed during a Lamaze childbirth class to be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 17, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT: A bereavement support group will meet at 3  p.m. Thursday, Aug. 17, at the Slidell Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Center, 1120 Robert Blvd. For information, call (985) 280-6612.

    HEARTSAVER FIRST AID: A class in the basic techniques of adult and pediatric CPR, first aid for choking and how to use an automated external defibrillator will be presented from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Friday, Aug. 18, in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd., Slidell. The fee is $40, and certification cards will be issued upon completion. To register, call (985) 280-8585.

    CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., first and third Fridays of the month, Women’s Center for Healing and Transformation, 71667 Leveson St., Abita Springs. The next meeting will be Aug. 18. (985) 892-8111.

    AGING IN PLACE: Occupational therapist Fran Benigno will discuss the costs of moving vs. remaining in place for elderly people during a free Lunch Learn program at 11:30 a.m. Friday, Aug. 25, in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd., Slidell. The concept of aging in place includes universal design and making your home accessible. To register, call (985) 280-2657 or visit slidellmemorial.org.

    NORTHSHORE BIRTH OPTIONS: Jen Kamel, founder of VBAC Facts, will present a workshop on vaginal birth after cesareans from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 26, at Staybridge Suites, 140 Holiday Blvd., Covington. The workshop is being organized by Northshore Birth Options. The cost is $125. Participants will receive 6.6 nursing continuing education hours. For information, email options@northshorebirth.org. For tickets, visit eventbrite.com.

    BREAST-FEEDING CLINIC: Lactation consultants will offer support and encouragement from 9:30  a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 26, in the Florida Avenue conference room at Slidell Memorial Hospital, 1025 Florida Ave., Slidell. The program is free. To register, call (985) 280-8585 or visit slidellmemorial.org.

    MALL WALKERS: North Shore Square Mall, 150 Northshore Blvd., Slidell, will open for walkers at 7 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 30, through a partnership with Slidell Memorial Hospital to encourage people to walk with the advantages of the mall’s security, air conditioning and water fountains. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

    TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 30, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    MEDICARE AND SOCIAL SECURITY: Representatives of the Simon Simon Group will give a presentation on Medicare and Social Security from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 31, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292-1234.

    RELAY FOR LIFE: The American Cancer Society will present the Relay for Life of St. Tammany West from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 9, at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To participate, visit relayforlife.org/weststtammanyla or call Heidi McGrath at (985) 966-4731.

    PREPARING FOR CHILDBIRTH: When to come to the hospital, pain management and complications in pregnancy are among the topics that will be discussed during a childbirth preparation program from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 11, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    STROKE SUPPORT GROUP: A support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers will meet from 5:30  p.m. to 6:30  p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 13, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Discussion topics include nutrition, social services, rehabilitation therapy and medical management. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    GIRL TALK: Preteen and teen girls will learn about the physical, social and emotional changes of puberty during the Girl Talk session from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19, in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd., Slidell. Presenters will include pediatrician Alice LeBreton and dermatologist Deborah Hilton. Teens must be accompanied by an adult. The fee is $10 per family. To register, call (985) 280-2657 or visit slidellmemorial.org.

    BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: Caregivers may benefit from a basic life support course to be held from 8:15  a.m. to 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The course is designed to teach CPR for victims of all ages and use of an automated external defibrillator. The cost is $35 for the class, plus a $20 deposit for the book. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    LAKEVIEW REGIONAL AUXILIARY: The Lakeview Regional Medical Center Volunteer Auxiliary will hold a Savvy Linens fundraiser from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 20-21, in the main entrance lobby of the hospital, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Proceeds will benefit the auxiliary’s charities in St. Tammany Parish.

    NEWBORN CARE: Feeding, diapering, swaddling and bathing are among the topics to be covered during a newborn care class from 7  p.m. to 9  p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To make a reservation, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    LAKEVIEW REGIONAL AUXILIARY: The Lakeview Regional Medical Center Volunteer Auxiliary will hold a jewelry sale Wednesday through Friday, Oct. 4-6, in the main entrance lobby of the hospital, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Sale hours will be from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 4, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 5, and from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 6. Proceeds will benefit the auxiliary’s charities in St. Tammany Parish.

    SIBLING CLASS IN COVINGTON: A class for children ages 3-8 who are about to be big brothers and sisters will be held from 10  a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 7, in the Magnolia Room at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The children will watch a video about what it will be like to have a new baby at home and will practice with dolls or stuffed animals they have brought. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    STROKE SUPPORT GROUP: A support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers will meet from 5:30  p.m. to 6:30  p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 11, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Discussion topics include nutrition, social services, rehabilitation therapy and medical management. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: Caregivers may benefit from a basic life support course to be held from 8:15  a.m. to 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 11, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The course is designed to teach CPR for victims of all ages and use of an automated external defibrillator. The cost is $35 for the class, plus a $20 deposit for the book. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    LAMAZE CHILDBIRTH CLASS: Relaxation and breathing techniques for natural childbirth, signs and symptoms of labor, and postpartum care will be discussed during a Lamaze childbirth class to be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 12,  in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Bring a pillow and blanket. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit www.lakeviewregional.com.

    TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 17, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

    NUTRITION: Rebecca Lee will discuss approaches to achieving a healthy weight from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 26, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292.1234.

    BOO FEST: The ACCESS nonprofit for children with disabilities will be the beneficiaries of Boo Fest 2017, which will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28, at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The gates will open at 9 a.m. for special-needs families. Admission is $2. There will be more than 70 haunted houses, costume contests, pumpkin decorating, face painting and all-abilities games. ACCESS stands for Adapting and Changing Children’s Environments with Successful Solutions. Also, the Northshore Area Board of Realtors will hold its Chili Challenge during Boo Fest. For information, visit accesslouisiana.org/boofest-2017.

    FOOT CARE: Dr. Ryan Green will give a presentation, “The Right Fit for Your Feet,” from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 14, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292.1234.

    BABY AND ME TOBACCO-FREE: Slidell Memorial Hospital is holding smoking-cessation programs for expectant mothers on Mondays and Wednesdays by appointment. For information or to request an application, call Ashlee Menke at (504) 733-5539. 

    GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Gamblers Anonymous meets several times a week throughout the New Orleans area. Gamblers Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with one another that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from a gambling problem. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop gambling. For information, call (855) 222-5542 or visit gamblersanonymous.org.

    Article source: http://www.theadvocate.com/new_orleans/news/communities/st_tammany/article_7ce8d9b4-73d7-11e7-83e5-c700accd7931.html

    How to Eliminate Stress for Healthy Living

    As a family physician I continually talk to patients about  how to eliminate stress for healthy living. I have always known that finding happiness and balance in our life would bring better health. There are so many factors in our society today that are throwing this balance off and pushing us into burnout and stress.

    How to Reduce Stress to be Healthy and Happy By Living Well – Dr. Victoria Smithers

    By Dr. Victoria Smithers MD on Incline
    If not kept in check, stress can rob us of our health and happiness. We have lost the ability to just be in the moment, we are always multitasking- on the computer, texting, while listening to music and distracted. There is no peace, just chaos.

     Physical and Mental Symptoms of Stress on Our Bodies

    Physical and Mental Symptoms of Stress on Our BodiesStress is our bodies’ response to a demand or threat. It is our “fight or flight” response. In years past it allowed us to escape predators and run away from attackers. It is modulated by adrenaline and cortisol, our stress hormones. Stress can lead to physical symptoms like headaches, indigestion or palpitations.  If left unchecked the strain can lead to heart disease, ulcers, hypertension and mental health problems. Prolonged stress can lead to panic attacks, generalized anxiety, depression and insomnia. It is important to learn how to eliminate stress for healthy living.

    Why is Stress on the Rise in the US

    The National Institute of Mental Health reports 18% or 40 million of adults age 18 and older are affected with anxiety disorders. Common factors that are leading to increase stress in the US are economic hardships, loss of community, less social support, texting and social media, information overload on internet and television and intolerant attitude towards negative feelings. Our lives are so hectic; stress is triggered by traffic, busy schedules, work meetings, deadlines, computers that misbehave, financial worries and relationship problems.

    1. 5 Major Types of Anxiety Disorders
    2. Panic disorder is a condition in which feelings of terror strike suddenly. One can experience attacks that include sweating, chest pain, palpitations, feeling of choking or shortness of breath with a feeling of impending doom.
    3. Social anxiety is overwhelming worry and self-consciousness about social situations.
    4. Phobias are fears of a specific object or situation like heights of driving.
    5. Post-traumatic stress disorder is a condition caused by a traumatic event where anxiety or fear is brought on by flash backs or triggers related to event- like loud noises.
    6. Generalized anxiety disorder is a condition that demonstrates unrealistic worry and tension.

    Common Symptoms of Anxiety Disorder

    • feelings of panic or fear
    • problems sleeping
    • cold or sweaty hands or feet
    • shortness of breath
    • heart palpitations
    • not being able to sit still
    • dry mouth
    • numbness or tingling in the hands or feet
    • nausea
    • muscle tension
    • dizziness

    Optimism for Happiness

    Optimism for HappinessTrying to find happiness in our hectic lives is a real challenge. There is a growing field of research called Positive Psychology. They have done extensive research into what makes people happy. They have determined that 50 % is determined by genetics, 40% by behavior and 10% by circumstances. A recent study has shown that individuals that are optimistic and have a greater sense of purpose have a 20% reduction in major illnesses. Another study has shown that those individuals reporting increased happiness ratings live 10 years longer than those reporting low happiness ratings. More research has been done to see how we can increase our optimism and happiness ratings. There are some simple steps you can take to learn how to eliminate stress for healthy living .

    How to Find Happiness and Improve Your Health

    • Researchers, Robert Emmons and Mike McCullough, at UC Davis have determined that keeping a gratitude journal improves optimism and feeling better about life.
    • Another researcher, Martin Seligman, found that delivering a letter of gratitude to someone for their kindness caused a large increase in happiness scores.
    • Practicing mindfulness allows the person to focus on the present moment through meditation and can reduce stress.
    • Practicing random acts of kindness improves happiness ratings.
    • A 75 year-long Harvard study on happiness showed that it wasn’t money or jobs but positive relationships that had largest impact on happiness.
    • Just being surrounded by happy people makes you happier.
    • The happiest people sleep eight hours a night.
    • Get plenty of sunlight
    • Omega 3 Fatty Acids in fish
    • Smile

    How to Reduce Stress in Your Life

    Simple steps can be taken to reduce stress in your life. Simplify your life, limit technology, set boundaries, follow Gods plan for your life, practice time management and stay positive. Practicing gratitude every day and limiting gossip and complaining help keep things positive. Laughter is a very powerful tool to lower stress. Routine relaxation such as prayer, meditation, technology breaks and time spent in nature all reduce stress and is a big part of learning how to eliminate stress for healthy living. Practicing outreach through acts of kindness, volunteering in community and missions all provide us with purpose.  Healthy living through healthy sleep practices, exercise like walking or yoga, eating a heart healthy diet, decreasing caffeine and avoiding drug use all improve health.

    Practice Gratitude for Stress Relief

    Sonja Lyubominsky a happiness researcher at UC Riverside found that journaling on gratitude for 6 weeks increased individuals satisfaction with life and Robert Emmons at UC Davis stated that engaging in gratitude exercises like thankyou letters elevates mood. So start your day with a list of what you are grateful for and show your appreciation throughout your week. Meditate on your list and watch it grow!

    How to Eliminate Stress for Healthy Living

    How to Eliminate Stress for Healthy LivingIt is important to put technology free space back in our lives. Learn to embrace the quiet. When you stop the steady flow of sensory input from your electronic devices you can see things much more clearly. It reminds us to be grateful for all of our blessings. Venture outside to enjoy a tech free day. R at people lowered their cortisol (a stress hormone) and reported an improvement in their mood after just 30 minutes of gardening. So remember gardening as a great way to get healthy, reduce stress and grow healthy vegetables for family and friends. Connecting again with nature has been a real joy. I am so grateful for God’s amazing love and peace in his presence. Learning to stop long enough, turn off all the media devices, quiet all the noise in our heads and listen takes some practice. It is in the quiet and the stilling of our thoughts, surrounded by nature, that we can let go of stress, draw closer to Him, and learn how to eliminate stress for healthy living.

    Walking for Stress Relief

    I am constantly giving out advice about healthy forms of exercise. I often recommend a walking program for patients who have not had an active lifestyle. Walking is a good aerobic workout and does not require expensive equipment. 10,000 steps a day is a great goal to set for yourself and has been shown to improve health.

    Yoga for Stress Relief and Improved Health

    Another exercise I encourage people to try is yoga. Yoga is a 5000 plus year practice. It combines strengthening and stretching poses with special breathing and meditation.  There are many different forms of yoga. It helps to take a beginner class to be taught the poses and breathing.  The intensity can vary quite a bit depending on the style of yoga so you want to be sure it matches your fitness level. This is a great way to learn how to eliminate stress for healthy living.

    Benefits of Yoga for Stress Relief

    •  improved emotional healthBenefits of Yoga for Stress Relief
    • enhanced strength, flexibility and balance
    • lessened  back pain
    • enhanced fertility
    • improved cardiac health
    • eased  symptoms of asthma
    • improved  pain from arthritis
    • improved sleep

    There are many other positive effects to yoga. It is felt that the majority of it’s benefits are achieved by the deep level of relaxation that you can attain by participating in a regular yoga practice. Yoga should be combined with a good aerobic workout for maximum benefit. You may have to try different forms to find the right one for you. But I encourage you try a Hatha class, it is the most common form of yoga.

    The American diet is full of all the wrong things. Our lives are so busy and full of stress. I recently reviewed the literature to see which of the popular diets are most effective. Across the board in multiple studies and reviews Weight Watchers was ranked #1. Also in the top 5 were the DASH diet, the Mediterranean diet, TLC Diet and the Dean Ornish diet. It is important to remind people to see their doctors to evaluate for medical problems leading to weight gain; such as thyroid abnormalities and Type 2 Diabetes which requires medication and special diets. Once these problems are ruled out and you are given a clean bill of health you can start a healthy weight loss program. Remember all programs should include a diet program and regular exercise, and greatly impacts learning how to eliminate stress for healthy living.

    15 Steps to Reduce Stress and Prevent Anxiety

    1. Exercise- walking and yoga
    2. Volunteer
    3. Practice gratitude
    4. Practice mindfulness meditation
    5. Perform random acts of kindness
    6. Develop strong, positive relationships
    7. Get sunlight
    8. Enjoy nature
    9. Sleep well
    10. Eat healthy diet- fish and lots of fruits and vegetable
    11. Laugh often
    12. Smile
    13. Simplify life
    14. Limit technology
    15. Stay positive

    For anyone who is suffering from more severe stress, anxiety or mental health problems it is important to seek counseling and mental health treatment if these stress reduction techniques do not improve your symptoms. Sometimes medication and behavioral therapy are necessary to reduce anxiety. Find a good doctor near you to get the help you need. One who can teach you how to eliminate stress for healthy living.

    Health and Happiness!!




     

     

    Article source: http://checkbiotech.org/how-to-eliminate-stress-for-healthy-living/