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HEALTHY LIVING: Learning to think of exercise as fun

One of the best ways to ensure we do the things we need to every day is to want to do them. We are more likely to get our tasks done if we wake up excited to do them. Nobody enjoys a day full of “chores.” This can be applied to a lot of different areas in our lives.

Work becomes a lot more fun when you are excited to accomplish the task instead of slogging through the hours required to pay the bills. Exercise becomes a whole different animal when we aren’t “exercising” but rather playing.

Consistency is king when it comes to exercise, so setting ourselves up for success instead of failure is important. Making our exercise our play time not only makes it more enjoyable, but it also helps us to not skip it. It’s a whole lot harder to skip doing something fun than it is a chore.

If we know we don’t like going to the gym, it might not be the best plan to rely on that for our daily dose of exercise. But if we love being outdoors, maybe we should schedule some activity at Boomer Lake, the cross country course or the golf course. I know a lot of folks would love to have an excuse to tee off every single day, so take advantage of those urges to build a healthy habit.

In the ideal world, we enjoy our work and exercise is our pleasure time. This doesn’t mean that everyone needs to have the same pleasures in life, but rather we all need to find some activity that we enjoy doing. Some folks like to lift weights, some people like to run, and others like to practice martial arts. The important part is that we need to be active.

From a purely medical standpoint, we’re probably better off if we get a good smattering of strength-based activity, some cardiovascular effort, and some kind of coordination type activity. Not all of us are well rounded athletes though, so it can sometimes feel like work doing the other types of exercise we need to do to keep us healthy.

But branching out can help keep the things we like doing fun since it helps keep them from becoming “work”. Discovering new challenges every now and again doesn’t hurt either.

In terms of physics, there isn’t any difference between exercise and play. But the way we think about it can make all the difference in the world. Being excited about it helps us not skip it. Being pumped about the workout can also help us get a little more out of it too. Your workout shouldn’t be a chore. Go play.

Dylan Allen is the health columnist for the Stillwater News Press. He is a running coach and certified personal trainer. Healthy Living usually runs on Thursdays.

Article source: http://www.stwnewspress.com/sports/sports_columns/healthy-living-learning-to-think-of-exercise-as-fun/article_235f92b2-0a33-55b3-b552-a337f8773bfd.html

Ticks, Lyme disease may be on the rise in NWI

Whenever Giles Bruce posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Article source: http://www.nwitimes.com/niche/get-healthy/healthy-living/ticks-lyme-disease-may-be-on-the-rise-in-nwi/article_3cddbaa2-0135-5ce0-8317-da788f004cf5.html

Tribal Council approves contract for healthy living grant

The Cherokee Nation Tribal Council approved a contract with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Healthy Living Program worth more than $350,000 at the legislative body’s June meeting.

The tribe’s Public Health Department was awarded a grant worth $113,425 for fiscal year 2017 and $240,000 for fiscal year 2018 to prevent and reduce tobacco use, increase physical activity and improve nutrition in Adair County.

“The tribe receiving this grant is a great thing for the citizens of Adair County,” said Tribal Council Secretary Frankie Hargis, who chairs the health committee. “I commend our employees for working diligently to ensure this funding and resources will stay in Adair County. I hope with the leadership of our public health officials we can make a great impact on the health of our county through this grant.”

Funding provided by the TSET Healthy Living Program is designed to prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease at the community level. The goal is to target places where funding will make the most impact, including businesses, governments, schools and community organizations.

Article source: http://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/news/tribal-council-approves-contract-for-healthy-living-grant/article_c1a81cf8-a671-5bbc-b991-c757094ce39f.html

Christie Brinkley on ageism, healthy living and how a sick puppy started her career

Christie Brinkley owes it all to a puppy. Before she became a world-renowned model, Brinkley was an aspiring artist living in Paris. She brought a puppy — named Tempête — to keep her company, but unfortunately, little Tempête fell ill with distemper. Brinkley didn’t have a phone at the time — this was before the age of smartphones — so she headed to a nearby office to call a veterinarian.

“I walked into the telephoning office and this guy goes, ‘I was waiting for you to come back. I’m a photographer and I’ve got my first big job. I was thinking you have the look that they described. Will you do it?’” she explains. “It was thanks to my puppy that I thought, ‘Let me just see what it’s like and do one little thing.’” And that, folks, is the power of pets.

Brinkley, 63, held court at IMG’s offices in Manhattan on Tuesday morning to promote healthy pet aging and her partnership with Purina Pro Plan. She opened up to WWD about healthy aging for humans and their pets, ageism in the modeling industry and what it was like posing alongside daughters Alexa Ray Joel and Sailor Brinkley-Cook for Sports Illustrated earlier this year.

WWD: Do you think people are aware of the importance of healthy pet aging?

Healthy Living: June 20, 2017 | WABI TV5

Healthy Living: June 20, 2017

Beyond Lyme Disease- the Importance of Tick Safety
By: Amy Movius, MD – Eastern Maine Medical Center
In my previous Healthy Living Segment, the focus was on Lyme disease prevention. It is a topic that becomes increasingly relevant for Mainers as the prevalence of this bacterial disease continues to rise. This year, the tick population was anticipated to be especially large and if the number of insects sighted just in my own household is any indication, this prediction is living up to the expectations.
Though Lyme disease is the most common infection transmitted by ticks in our states, it is not the only one – not by a long shot. Unfortunately there are several other tick-borne infections, and a single tick can transmit multiple infections in the same bite, giving Mainers more than enough reason to take tick awareness seriously.
1. Anaplasmosis is another bacterial infection transmitted to humans by infected deer ticks. It can cause very mild to severe of fatal (1%) disease. Symptoms usually happen within 1-2 weeks of tick bite. As with Lyme disease, early antibiotic treatment is effective.
2. Babesiosis is a parasite infection that can be transmitted by ticks. It can also cause mild to serious disease that resembles malaria. It can persist in the bloodstream for months – so it can also be spread in blood transfusions. Symptoms can begin a week or so after tick exposure and it can usually be treated with a combination of antimicrobials that are different from those used for Lyme disease or Anaplasmosis. This means getting the right treatment for those infections does NOT protect you from Babesiosis.
3. Powassan Encephalitis is a viral infection transmitted by multiple types of ticks. The symptoms can come on within days of sustaining a tick bite. The federal CDC reports up to a 10% fatality. There is no specific treatment but hospitalization with aggressive supportive treatment can be lifesaving. It has been thankfully very rare in Maine up to this point, but the Maine CDC has already reported two cases this year (both were hospitalized and survived).
As frightening as this all sounds, some simple good habits can go a long way to keeping you and your family safe, by preventing tick bites in the first place. The No Ticks 4 ME campaign is the state wide prevention campaign and includes:
1. Use caution in tick infested areas (wooded, bushy, and tall grass)
2. Wear protective clothing (long pants/sleeves, light colors)
3. Use an EPA approved repellent (DEET or Picardin, Permethrin for clothes, include pets)
4. Perform daily tick checks (people and pets, a lint roller can help)
Removing any tick with a “tick spoon” or tweezers, bathing after coming inside for the day, promptly washing outdoor clothes in hot water and/or running in hot dryer at least 10 minutes can also decrease your exposure. Making these habits a routine – like brushing your teeth – will help you have a healthy and fun summer.
References:

http://www.ticksinmaine.com/diseases

Article source: https://wabi.tv/2017/06/20/healthy-living-june-20-2017/

Christie Brinkley on Ageism, Healthy Living and How a Sick Puppy …



Christie Brinkley owes it all to a puppy. Before she became a world-renowned model, Brinkley was an aspiring artist living in Paris. She brought a puppy — named Tempête — to keep her company, but unfortunately, little Tempête fell ill with distemper. Brinkley didn’t have a phone at the time — this was before the age of smartphones — so she headed to a nearby office to call a veterinarian.

I walked into the telephoning office and this guy goes, ‘I was waiting for you to come back. I’m a photographer and I’ve got my first big job. I was thinking you have the look that they described. Will you do it?’” she explains. “It was thanks to my puppy that I thought, ‘Let me just see what it’s like and do one little thing.’” And that, folks, is the power of pets.

Brinkley, 63, held court at IMG’s offices in Manhattan on Tuesday morning to promote healthy pet aging and her partnership with Purina Pro Plan. She opened up to WWD about healthy aging for humans and their pets, ageism in the modeling industry and what it was like posing alongside daughters Alexa Ray Joel and Sailor Brinkley-Cook for Sports Illustrated earlier this year.

WWD: Do you think people are aware of the importance of healthy pet aging?
Christie Brinkley: We’re not aware of it until it’s almost too late. Dogs are aging on the inside. With the right nutrition, you can help address that and stave it off longer, just like with us. I truly believe in you are what you eat and I truly believe in the power of food to affect the way we feel and our health. It’s the same for dogs and Purina Pro Plan has spent decades studying aging in pets.

WWD: What was the first pet you ever had?
C.B.: My first pet was a kitten named Tinkerbell. She was a little blonde kitten — she was so cute. I had cats up until I moved to Paris, when I got a puppy named Tempête. It was like a little snowstorm, this little fluffy, white [puppy], and tempête is French for storm.

WWD: You’ve been a vegetarian since age 13. What’s your outlook on healthy eating?
C.B.: 
What I’ve always believed is the best defense against [disease] is a diet that casts a wide net. I call it my rainbow diet. I like to encompass as many colors as I can in a day because at some point, you always get these news reports that everything gives you cancer. I think that it’s really benefited me to have had this lifetime of healthy eating behind me. It’s been a great foundation. And I raised all my kids as vegetarians, too.

WWD: What are some of the values you’ve instilled in your children when it comes to healthy aging?
C.B.: Eat right, exercise and sunblock are the three things that will affect your outcome more than anything, as well as a healthy attitude. An attitude of gratitude is the formula for a happy life and I truly believe that happiness contributes to your wellbeing and to your health.

WWD: Do they follow your advice?
C.B.: 
They actually do. It’s amazing, but they do. Sailor and Jack, I must say, the sunblock, they’re a little lax on that. They’re just golden by the end of the summer, but at least they do try.

WWD: Earlier this year you modeled for Sports Illustrated with daughters Alexa Ray and Sailor. What was that like?
C.B.: It was really fun. Sailor had never told anybody that that was a dream of hers.

WWD: To model with you or to model in SI?
C.B.: 
To model in Sports Illustrated. She had never told a soul and then when this offer came along, all of a sudden it was like she just let the cat out of the bag. That was incredible for her and it was so exciting to see her that excited because Sailor used to really love to eat and tended to be on the chubbier side. She really transformed herself. She really decided she wanted to be as fit and healthy as she could possibly be.

WWD: What about Alexa?
C.B.: Alexa, it was really amazing to see her have that opportunity to be appreciated for the beauty that she is because, as Alexa calls it, she was a late bloomer. The press was really cruel to her. I can’t even talk about it without it hurting me to think about it because to see a child go through something like that at, like, nine years old, to come across an article that’s criticizing your looks. It really did mark her and she constantly has to reinforce her own internal confidence and self-esteem. It’s been a constant battle because of all of that, so it meant a lot for her to have that opportunity to just be gorgeous. My girls looked so stunning. As much as I love making it about their accomplishments rather than their looks, it was nice for both of them to have that moment to go, “OK, there.”

WWD: It’s an accomplishment when you work really hard on your body.
C.B.: It is. In the olden days, they used to say a model would be chewed up and spit out by the time she was 30 and that you, just like an athlete, have your years when you’re going to have your work and you need to exploit that moment. It’s wonderful that my industry is embracing all forms of diversity in beauty and that is now also including breaking that ageism barrier that we have allowed women in America to be defined by. They’ve been almost like prisoners of these rules that are supposed to apply to women over 30. It’s so great to see that changing as well.

More from WWD.com:

Natasha Lyonne Talks ‘OITNB’ Season 5 and Getting Intimate With Yael Stone

Alison Brie Readies to Rumble

Nicole Kidman Through the Years: Celebrating Her Style Evolution

Article source: http://wwd.com/eye/people/christie-brinkley-ageism-and-healthy-living-10922910/

Lynchburg’s Got the Beet with new healthy living campaign

Megan Steeves gives her daughter, Madelyn Steeves, 8, a taste of the two-bite challenge at the Lynchburg Community Market on Wednesday, June 21, 2017.

Article source: http://www.newsadvance.com/news/local/lynchburg-s-got-the-beet-with-new-healthy-living-campaign/article_748a9b44-56dc-11e7-b322-fff41abc84b6.html

Healthy Living: Is Food Addiction Real? – Northern Michigan’s News Leader

Brice Crawford’s family says he was jumping into the Muskegon River near Evart, having fun, when he hurt himself in shallow water. They saw he had been drinking at the time but don’t kn…

Article source: http://www.9and10news.com/story/35712554/healthy-living-is-food-addiction-real

Healthy Living: Summer arms






CHAMPAIGN–

Elsie Hedgspeth Fitness Wellness Coordinator from The Urbana Park District Joins us now for Healthy Living. 

Summer heat and sunshine is in full force which means that many of us are sporting shorter sleeves or no sleeves at all. So how do we keep our arms looking strong and summer ready?

Talking points: 

·         Toning can be achieved through using your own body weight—equipment not necessary.

·         The shoulder area is prone to injuries- therefore good form is essential when working the shoulder      area.

·         Elevate push-ups to make the movement wore attainable for beginners.

 

 

Article source: http://www.illinoishomepage.net/the-morning-show/healthy-living-summer-arms/746201464

Healthy Living: June 20, 2017

Healthy Living: June 20, 2017

Beyond Lyme Disease- the Importance of Tick Safety
By: Amy Movius, MD – Eastern Maine Medical Center
In my previous Healthy Living Segment, the focus was on Lyme disease prevention. It is a topic that becomes increasingly relevant for Mainers as the prevalence of this bacterial disease continues to rise. This year, the tick population was anticipated to be especially large and if the number of insects sighted just in my own household is any indication, this prediction is living up to the expectations.
Though Lyme disease is the most common infection transmitted by ticks in our states, it is not the only one – not by a long shot. Unfortunately there are several other tick-borne infections, and a single tick can transmit multiple infections in the same bite, giving Mainers more than enough reason to take tick awareness seriously.
1. Anaplasmosis is another bacterial infection transmitted to humans by infected deer ticks. It can cause very mild to severe of fatal (1%) disease. Symptoms usually happen within 1-2 weeks of tick bite. As with Lyme disease, early antibiotic treatment is effective.
2. Babesiosis is a parasite infection that can be transmitted by ticks. It can also cause mild to serious disease that resembles malaria. It can persist in the bloodstream for months – so it can also be spread in blood transfusions. Symptoms can begin a week or so after tick exposure and it can usually be treated with a combination of antimicrobials that are different from those used for Lyme disease or Anaplasmosis. This means getting the right treatment for those infections does NOT protect you from Babesiosis.
3. Powassan Encephalitis is a viral infection transmitted by multiple types of ticks. The symptoms can come on within days of sustaining a tick bite. The federal CDC reports up to a 10% fatality. There is no specific treatment but hospitalization with aggressive supportive treatment can be lifesaving. It has been thankfully very rare in Maine up to this point, but the Maine CDC has already reported two cases this year (both were hospitalized and survived).
As frightening as this all sounds, some simple good habits can go a long way to keeping you and your family safe, by preventing tick bites in the first place. The No Ticks 4 ME campaign is the state wide prevention campaign and includes:
1. Use caution in tick infested areas (wooded, bushy, and tall grass)
2. Wear protective clothing (long pants/sleeves, light colors)
3. Use an EPA approved repellent (DEET or Picardin, Permethrin for clothes, include pets)
4. Perform daily tick checks (people and pets, a lint roller can help)
Removing any tick with a “tick spoon” or tweezers, bathing after coming inside for the day, promptly washing outdoor clothes in hot water and/or running in hot dryer at least 10 minutes can also decrease your exposure. Making these habits a routine – like brushing your teeth – will help you have a healthy and fun summer.
References:

http://www.ticksinmaine.com/diseases

Article source: https://wabi.tv/2017/06/20/healthy-living-june-20-2017/