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UVM enshrines healthy living in bricks and mortar

BURLINGTON, Vt. — Pledges by college students to eschew drugs and alcohol are old hat. Now they’re meditating, working out, practicing yoga, eating healthfully, and at least one school, the University of Vermont, it has become a bona fide lifestyle.

In UVM’s Wellness Environment, known as WE, students live in a new, big substance-free dorm, take a required class in what affects the health of their brains and bodies, and are given incentives to stay healthy like access to a free gym membership, nutrition and fitness coaches and an app that tracks their activities.

“We created an environment where we believe if we offer young people healthy foods, healthy choices, they’ll make them. We reward those things, and we don’t encourage the negative things, so the rule in the environment is no alcohol, no drugs, and the students follow it,” said Dr. Jim Hudziak, the chief of child psychiatry at the UVM’s Larner College of Medicine, who founded the Wellness Environment or WE program.

It goes beyond the wellness and substance-free residential halls found at some colleges.

“It looks at them (students) as an individual, which is really important obviously for health and wellness, but then it’s also making changes to their community,” said David Arnold, of the Washington-based NASPA, Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education. “So combining those two things together as well as working broader with faculty is actually a very, very impressive implementation of that process.”

At the start of a recent class, “Healthy Brains, Healthy Bodies,” the auditorium full of students stood with eyes closed for a few minutes of meditation. Then Hudziak, who tosses a brain-shaped football to students in the auditorium before class, discussed neuroscience topics including how traumatic or stressful experiences in childhood can affect physical and mental health.

And there’s no tolerance for alcohol or drugs in the dorm. If you’re caught with either in the environment, you’re thrown out, Hudziak said.

“I’m a genetic neuroscientist and child psychiatrist who wanted to end what I thought and saw was very damaging cultures in university settings, and I thought using neuroscience and behavior change science rather than sort of lecturing and setting standards of behavior would work,” he said.

That makes for a quieter dorm, said freshman Cole Spaulding, of Waterbury, as he worked out in the dorm’s fitness center on a recent evening.

“You’re sitting at home in your dorm, and it’s not like people are yelling. You know the bathrooms are always clean. It’s a nice place to just live,” he said.

WE students pay the same rate for campus housing as other students.

After a recent evening meditation class in the dorm, Hannah Bryant, of Brewster, Massachusetts, said her choice to join WE already has paid off.

She bases her life around living a healthy lifestyle and liked the chance to be surrounded by healthy opportunities like yoga, meditation and good food.

“Just like already within the first three weeks of school has already made a huge difference. And it’s things like this, the 30 minutes, that can really change your week around,” she said.

Through the app, students earn coins for healthy choices that can be used to buy WE paraphernalia — socks, sweat shirts, hats. They’re also encouraged to mentor kids in the community as one of the four pillars on which the program is based: fitness, mindfulness, nutrition and relationships.

Freshman Joy Vincenzo of Portland, Connecticut, said she chose the WE program because in high school she would get stressed about school work.

The UVM program has helped in her first few weeks of college. She does yoga and, when she has breaks between classes, she might go to the gym for 20 minutes.

“This argument of WE is, if we teach and practice these health-promoting activities, when things get tough, you’ll rely on a whole new set of skills,” Hudziak said.

Article source: http://www.berkshireeagle.com/stories/uvm-enshrines-healthy-living-in-bricks-and-mortar,521860

University of Vermont dorm promotes healthy lifestyle, yoga

The University of Vermont in Burlington, VT, has opened a dorm that goes beyond mere bans on drugs and alcohol to promote overall healthy lifestyles. Students meditate, practice yoga, eat well and make other healthy choices in the Wellness Environment.

 (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke))

Students living in a new dorm at the University of Vermont (UVM) are taking their health to the next level.

UVM’s Wellness Environment, more commonly known as WE, is a new, substance-free dorm that goes beyond just banning drugs and alcohol.

Students who choose to live there must take a class called “Healthy Brains, Healthy Bodies” which teaches students about different things that affect body and brain health. WE students also have access to yoga and meditation, healthy foods, and a free gym membership. They can also consult nutrition and fitness coaches who assist them on their wellness journeys.

The dorm has a zero-tolerance policy for drugs and alcohol. If a student is found with either, they’re kicked out.

“We created an environment where we believe if we offer young people healthy foods, healthy choices, they’ll make them. We reward those things, and we don’t encourage the negative things, so the rule in the environment is no alcohol, no drugs, and the students follow it,” Dr. Jim Hudziak, the chief of child psychiatry at the UVM’s Larner College of Medicine, who founded the WE program, said.

The WE way of life seems to be catching on: the program, which started with just 120 freshman last year, has almost quadrupled this semester. WE students pay the same rate as students who live in other campus housing.

Students can also track their activities through an app, and earn “coins” to purchase WE shirts, sweatshirts, hats, and other items.

University student Hannah Bryant, of Brewster, MA, said she enjoys WE’s food, yoga and meditation options. Bryant added that the WE lifestyle has already been beneficial for her.

“Just like already within the first three weeks of school has already made a huge difference,” she said. “And it’s things like this, the 30 minutes, that can really change your week around.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Article source: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/10/11/university-vermont-dorm-promotes-healthy-lifestyle-yoga.html

Why ‘The Heart’ gripped my heart

Beautifully translated from its original French, the book recounts in exquisite detail the story of 19-year-old Simon Limbres. The young man who loves surfing and his girlfriend, Juliette, dies on an icy road after an invigorating,  wave-kissing sunrise ocean venture with two friends. 

We hardly know him while he’s living. He spends most of the book between life and death, waiting for his grief-wrenched parents to decide whether to allow his strong and perfect organs to save the lives of other people. We also meet on personal and professional levels everyone connected with such decisions.

I checked this book out from the library and ended up buying my own copy … and making sure I checked the “organ donor” box on my driver’s license.

Article source: https://www.dallasnews.com/life/healthy-living/2017/10/13/heart-gripped-heart

County Lines: HEAL Summit to focus on eating healthy, living actively

The summit is open to anyone with an interest or stake in health and human services, food services, businesses, schools, parks and recreation programs and local government, an event spokesman said.

Article source: http://santamariatimes.com/news/local/county-lines-heal-summit-to-focus-on-eating-healthy-living/article_5127a396-2e18-5dc3-aaf6-3fc0eb493904.html

Healthy Living and Leadership

Who should apply?

The HLL Scholars program is ideal for students pursuing allied health fields in which health promotion is a cornerstone. These fields include physical and occupational therapy, physician assistant, athletic training, nursing, wellness and public health, personal training, and strength coaching.   The Georgetown College KHS department is recognized for excellence by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).


“Georgetown’s Kinesiology department is second to none. The KHS professors have all walked the walk in the health and fitness field and teach you how to apply the degree you’re getting.” 

Sean Kratchman, 2015


What are the benefits?

  • Attend guest lectures by speakers in their field
  • Go on field trips to local graduate programs of interest
  • Meet professionals in their areas of interest to expand their professional network

What are the admission requirements?

  • Apply by February 1st
  • Optional letter of recommendation
  • Interview on February 16th at Georgetown Scholars Day (if invited)

What are the requirements of the program?

  • Maintain active and ongoing membership in the Kinesiology and Health Studies (KHS) or Athletic Training (AT) Club, student-led organizations which provide leadership, experiential learning, and networking opportunities
  • Complete a 3-hour internship as part of the coursework required for the major. AT students will complete a Volunteer Clinical Experience. The KHS department has established sites for all careers so that HLL scholars can earn college credit while building their professional resumes
  • Sign and honor the HLL Scholars Healthy Living Pledge in which they agree to complete the academic requirements and serve as role models of physical, mental, and spiritual health  

Article source: http://www.georgetowncollege.edu/academics/programs-of-distinction/healthy-living-and-leadership

If you think you know cancer, it’s time to think again


How guilt, anxiety and distress may help fight cancer

Oct 13, 2017

Having cancer would make anyone scared, stressed and angry. In some cases, that might be a good thing. Recent research suggests that negative emotions may improve the health of cancer survivors by motivating them to behave in healthier ways. Read the story »

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-he-hl-healthy-living-cancer/

Central Park development in Highlands Ranch shaping up to have healthy living theme

Doors are opening in the last frontier for ground-up retail development in Highlands Ranch in the shadow of the six-story UCHealth Highlands Ranch Hospital near Lucent Boulevard and C-470. 

So far, many of the confirmed tenants are health- and wellness-oriented — apparently by accident rather than design.

“We didn’t seek it out, but we were pleased to see it happen,” said Peter Culshaw, executive vice president of Shea Properties, the development corporation behind Highlands Ranch. “We’ve been stunned at the demand we’ve seen so far for these types of uses.”

The 100-acre Central Park development will include more than 250 apartments, 200 single-family homes, the UCHealth extension campus and an assortment of shops, restaurants and fitness studios. 

All of the retail shops are expected to open by summer, Culshaw said, including Orangetheory Fitness, Mad Greens, Zoe’s Kitchen, a cycling studio, Torchy’s Tacos, Old Chicago, Rock Bottom and other restaurants. Culshaw expects to lock in two more international tenants. 

Sixty percent of the center is leased, he said, and agreements are underway on nearly 25 percent more.  

“I’m giddy with excitement because it’s like a blank canvas and we’ve been able to script a world-class (campus) out of it,” Culshaw said. “It’s really the last opportunity to build really cool, mixed-used development in Highlands Ranch.”

The $315 million UCHealth Highlands Ranch Hospital is slated to open in the first half of 2019, UCHealth Highlands Ranch Hospital president Diane Cookson said. It will include an emergency department, birthing wing and a medical office building that includes a cancer center offering radiation and oncology treatment.

“The interesting thing about this hospital is that we’re going to have specialists and sub-specialists from the university (Anschutz Medical campus in Aurora) come down and work out of there,” Cookson said. “That community will get more advanced care close to home and not worry about driving out to Aurora to get cancer care.”

The hospital will create 400 permanent jobs, and 500 to 600 construction jobs. 

So far, the only Central Park business open to the public is Barre3, a barre fitness studio franchise at 1493 Park Central Drive. Almost as soon as owner Britney Palmer opened the doors Sept. 14, south metro residents flooded in.

“It’s been absolutely amazing,” Palmer said. “We have had some constraints with people trying to find us because we do look like a construction site still, but the two entrances are open, the sign is up on our building, and once they find it, they’re in and their hooked.”

More than 500 people walked through the doors of the one-room studio during the opening weekend, she said, and she expects that number will increase as more nearby businesses open.

“Almost everything opening here is a perfect complement to us,” Palmer said. “Yes, there are a lot of fitness uses, but Barre3 is a high-cardio, deep muscle burn and mind/body connection. It’s very different from anything else.”

The Highlands Ranch Metro District is building a 3-acre community park in the middle of the development. It will be called Central Park.

A large, chopstick-shaped structure (an emergency services communication tower) marks the heart of the future park. Lights in a band around the tower will change color every hour.

“It’s going to a really cool park because it’s very different from the rest of the parks that we have here in Highlands Ranch,” said Carrie Ward, parks, recreation and open space director with the Highlands Ranch Metro District. “It’s going to have a permanent maze built out of tall, ornamental grasses and there will be a discovery prize at the center of it. There’s nothing else like that anywhere here.”

The association is installing slack line poles and constructing a large beer garden that will hold more than 200 people and be available for rent. The park should open next summer, Ward said. 

“We’re excited for the park to open,” Palmer said. “We’ll probably be doing classes out there in the park next year. We really love the development and plan to soak up everything it has to offer.”

Article source: http://www.denverpost.com/2017/10/12/highlands-ranch-hospital-uchealth-central-park-orangetheory-barre-torchys/

County Lines: HEAL Summit to focus on eating healthy, living actively;

The summit is open to anyone with an interest or stake in health and human services, food services, businesses, schools, parks and recreation programs and local government, an event spokesman said.

Article source: http://santamariatimes.com/news/local/county-lines-heal-summit-to-focus-on-eating-healthy-living/article_5127a396-2e18-5dc3-aaf6-3fc0eb493904.html

Healthy living and parenting conference coming to Chicago area – WLS

On Friday, October 13 and Saturday, October 14, the Moms Meet WOW Summit will be coming to Chicagoland for the first time ever! Held at Eaglewood Resort Spa in Itasca, the two-day healthy living and parenting conference will bring together hundreds of parents, bloggers, and brands for expert-led seminars, workshops, and more. This powerful event, filled with inspiration and education, joins like-minded women committed to leading a healthy lifestyle.

Registered dietitian and nutritionist Dawn Jackson Blatner has some advice in her new book, “The Superfood Swap.” She stopped ABC7 and brought some examples of what not to eat and better for you options.

Moms Meet, host of the WOW Summit, is an online community empowering parents to raise healthier families. Moms Meet is a partner of magazine, the leading parenting resource for natural and organic living.

For a complete itinerary, please visit momsmeet.com/summit17/schedule.html. Be sure to check out the full list of speakers and view participating exhibitors and sponsors.

The WOW Summit welcomes moms, dads, grandparents, childcare providers, moms-to-be, bloggers, and influencers for a chance to connect with other parents, receive advice from top-notch healthy living and parenting experts, and sample and win amazing products. Each attendee will take home a large goody bag filled with free products and coupons, valued at over $150.

Article source: http://abc7chicago.com/health/healthy-living-and-parenting-conference-coming-to-chicago-area/2519961/

University of Vermont dorm promotes healthy lifestyle, yoga | Fox …

The University of Vermont in Burlington, VT, has opened a dorm that goes beyond mere bans on drugs and alcohol to promote overall healthy lifestyles. Students meditate, practice yoga, eat well and make other healthy choices in the Wellness Environment.

 (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke))

Students living in a new dorm at the University of Vermont (UVM) are taking their health to the next level.

UVM’s Wellness Environment, more commonly known as WE, is a new, substance-free dorm that goes beyond just banning drugs and alcohol.

Students who choose to live there must take a class called “Healthy Brains, Healthy Bodies” which teaches students about different things that affect body and brain health. WE students also have access to yoga and meditation, healthy foods, and a free gym membership. They can also consult nutrition and fitness coaches who assist them on their wellness journeys.

The dorm has a zero-tolerance policy for drugs and alcohol. If a student is found with either, they’re kicked out.

“We created an environment where we believe if we offer young people healthy foods, healthy choices, they’ll make them. We reward those things, and we don’t encourage the negative things, so the rule in the environment is no alcohol, no drugs, and the students follow it,” Dr. Jim Hudziak, the chief of child psychiatry at the UVM’s Larner College of Medicine, who founded the WE program, said.

The WE way of life seems to be catching on: the program, which started with just 120 freshman last year, has almost quadrupled this semester. WE students pay the same rate as students who live in other campus housing.

Students can also track their activities through an app, and earn “coins” to purchase WE shirts, sweatshirts, hats, and other items.

University student Hannah Bryant, of Brewster, MA, said she enjoys WE’s food, yoga and meditation options. Bryant added that the WE lifestyle has already been beneficial for her.

“Just like already within the first three weeks of school has already made a huge difference,” she said. “And it’s things like this, the 30 minutes, that can really change your week around.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Article source: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/10/11/university-vermont-dorm-promotes-healthy-lifestyle-yoga.html